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Digging at the Roots: A Reply to Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation

Digging at the Roots: A Reply to Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation Digging at the Roots: A Reply to Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation steven fesmire Radford University the t wo-a nd-a-h a lf y e a r s that Dewey lived in Japan and China offered him an East-West comparative standpoint to examine Euro-American pre- suppositions. In subsequent work, he took steps in the direction of a global philosophical outlook by promoting a fusion of aesthetic refinements with democratic experimentalism. The year 2021 marks the centennial of Dewey’s return to the United States, yet philosophers in this country have only begun to take in an emerging global philosophical scene that includes unfamiliar questions, angles, idioms, and emphases. This includes American pragmatists. In a sense, as Gregory Pappas has observed in the context of Latin American philosophies, pragmatism did not “grow up” in the United States. As a coher- ent philosophy, it originated there, and it is now growing up through critical and mutually transformative intracultural dialogue (Pappas; cf. Behuniak). As pragmatism continues to grow up, we can bear Thoreau’s words in mind: “I know of few radicals as yet who are radical enough.” He was im- plying, in an implicit jab at Emerson, that the radicals of his day http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Digging at the Roots: A Reply to Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation

The Pluralist , Volume 17 – Feb 26, 2022

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Digging at the Roots: A Reply to Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation steven fesmire Radford University the t wo-a nd-a-h a lf y e a r s that Dewey lived in Japan and China offered him an East-West comparative standpoint to examine Euro-American pre- suppositions. In subsequent work, he took steps in the direction of a global philosophical outlook by promoting a fusion of aesthetic refinements with democratic experimentalism. The year 2021 marks the centennial of Dewey’s return to the United States, yet philosophers in this country have only begun to take in an emerging global philosophical scene that includes unfamiliar questions, angles, idioms, and emphases. This includes American pragmatists. In a sense, as Gregory Pappas has observed in the context of Latin American philosophies, pragmatism did not “grow up” in the United States. As a coher- ent philosophy, it originated there, and it is now growing up through critical and mutually transformative intracultural dialogue (Pappas; cf. Behuniak). As pragmatism continues to grow up, we can bear Thoreau’s words in mind: “I know of few radicals as yet who are radical enough.” He was im- plying, in an implicit jab at Emerson, that the radicals of his day

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2022

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