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Despairing of Despair, Living for Today and the Day after Tomorrow: Reflections on Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation

Despairing of Despair, Living for Today and the Day after Tomorrow: Reflections on Naoko... Despairing of Despair, Living for Today and the Day after Tomorrow: Reflections on Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation vincent col apietro University of Rhode Island [W]e might despair of despair itself, rather than of life, and cast that off, and begin, and so reverse our direction. —Stanley Cavell, Senses of Walden (71) Introduction This is a finely conceived, elegantly written, and exquisitely executed work. At its center, there is Naoko Saito ’s creative appropriation of one of Cavell’s most fecund suggestions—philosophy is first and foremost an activity and, as such, it is either akin to or, more strongly, identifiable with practices of translation. Everything I have to say concerns translation, if only implicitly. Moreover, I offer everything as a friendly amendment. That is, I take my reflections on her book to be in accord with both the spirit and, in most in - stances, even the letter of her texts. Whether or not she receives my remarks as such is, of course, her prerogative. My intent regarding these suggestions is one thing, their reception another. Translation What is the scope of translation? Given its centrality, it is appropriate to consider whether translation is adequately conceived here. Specifically, it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Despairing of Despair, Living for Today and the Day after Tomorrow: Reflections on Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation

The Pluralist , Volume 17 – Feb 26, 2022

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Despairing of Despair, Living for Today and the Day after Tomorrow: Reflections on Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation vincent col apietro University of Rhode Island [W]e might despair of despair itself, rather than of life, and cast that off, and begin, and so reverse our direction. —Stanley Cavell, Senses of Walden (71) Introduction This is a finely conceived, elegantly written, and exquisitely executed work. At its center, there is Naoko Saito ’s creative appropriation of one of Cavell’s most fecund suggestions—philosophy is first and foremost an activity and, as such, it is either akin to or, more strongly, identifiable with practices of translation. Everything I have to say concerns translation, if only implicitly. Moreover, I offer everything as a friendly amendment. That is, I take my reflections on her book to be in accord with both the spirit and, in most in - stances, even the letter of her texts. Whether or not she receives my remarks as such is, of course, her prerogative. My intent regarding these suggestions is one thing, their reception another. Translation What is the scope of translation? Given its centrality, it is appropriate to consider whether translation is adequately conceived here. Specifically, it

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2022

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