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Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity

Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity josina vink Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO) cl assical pr agmatism, particul arly the work of John Dewey, has been foundational to the development of design as a discipline, although rarely directly acknowledged within the literature on design (Dixon 6–7). Recognizing the ways in which the dominant design paradigm reproduces coloniality and modernity (Akama et al. 60–62), I argue that going back to design’s roots in pragmatism can aid in building a more embodied, situated, and pluralistic design practice. In an attempt to counter the epistemic and ontological injustices perpetuated by design, I support the effort of redesign- ing design by drawing on pragmatist thinking to present alternative design practices aimed at building reflexivity. In doing so, I bring forward demon - strations of how design practice might act as “engaged philosophy,” practi- cally addressing issues in their social context (Hamington and Bardwell-Jones 1–6), with the aim of supporting intentional adaptation within a pluralistic, democratic society. Before I begin, it is important for me to position that I am writing this from Oslo, Norway, the city with the largest urban population of Sámi people, an Indigenous people that inhabit http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity

The Pluralist , Volume 17 – Feb 26, 2022

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity josina vink Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO) cl assical pr agmatism, particul arly the work of John Dewey, has been foundational to the development of design as a discipline, although rarely directly acknowledged within the literature on design (Dixon 6–7). Recognizing the ways in which the dominant design paradigm reproduces coloniality and modernity (Akama et al. 60–62), I argue that going back to design’s roots in pragmatism can aid in building a more embodied, situated, and pluralistic design practice. In an attempt to counter the epistemic and ontological injustices perpetuated by design, I support the effort of redesign- ing design by drawing on pragmatist thinking to present alternative design practices aimed at building reflexivity. In doing so, I bring forward demon - strations of how design practice might act as “engaged philosophy,” practi- cally addressing issues in their social context (Hamington and Bardwell-Jones 1–6), with the aim of supporting intentional adaptation within a pluralistic, democratic society. Before I begin, it is important for me to position that I am writing this from Oslo, Norway, the city with the largest urban population of Sámi people, an Indigenous people that inhabit

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2022

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