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Communities of Epistemic Resistance: Patricia Hill Collins and the Power of Naming Community

Communities of Epistemic Resistance: Patricia Hill Collins and the Power of Naming Community Communities of Epistemic Resistance: Patricia Hill Collins and the Power of Naming Community nancy mchugh Wittenberg University in her 2010 pa per, “the new politics of communit y,” Dr. Collins’s argument on community as conceptually and practically a political construct provides a vital connection to the American philosophical tradition, particu- larly the work of W. E. B. Du Bois and John Dewey. In my response to her paper, I combine components of her argument with her earlier work in black feminist epistemology. I tie these insights to Du Bois’s and Dewey’s arguments regarding how communities develop. These are then connected to the work by transnational feminist Chandra Mohanty and political scientist Benedict Anderson on imagined communities. I use these to develop a framework for thinking of some communities as communities of epistemic resistance, an insight that I take to be endemic to Collins’s range of work. I finish with a discussion of a community that I take to be representative of a community of epistemic resistance, the Mothers Committee of Bayview Hunters Point. Community as Construct and Constructed Collins argues that communities should be theoretically and practically under- stood as a political construct because not only does recognizing the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Communities of Epistemic Resistance: Patricia Hill Collins and the Power of Naming Community

The Pluralist , Volume 15 – Feb 13, 2020

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Communities of Epistemic Resistance: Patricia Hill Collins and the Power of Naming Community nancy mchugh Wittenberg University in her 2010 pa per, “the new politics of communit y,” Dr. Collins’s argument on community as conceptually and practically a political construct provides a vital connection to the American philosophical tradition, particu- larly the work of W. E. B. Du Bois and John Dewey. In my response to her paper, I combine components of her argument with her earlier work in black feminist epistemology. I tie these insights to Du Bois’s and Dewey’s arguments regarding how communities develop. These are then connected to the work by transnational feminist Chandra Mohanty and political scientist Benedict Anderson on imagined communities. I use these to develop a framework for thinking of some communities as communities of epistemic resistance, an insight that I take to be endemic to Collins’s range of work. I finish with a discussion of a community that I take to be representative of a community of epistemic resistance, the Mothers Committee of Bayview Hunters Point. Community as Construct and Constructed Collins argues that communities should be theoretically and practically under- stood as a political construct because not only does recognizing the

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 13, 2020

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