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Cinema Chicana: An Interview with Lourdes Portillo

Cinema Chicana: An Interview with Lourdes Portillo michelle j. martinez as a young girl in rural arizona, I attended rodeos where the majority of the cowboys were Indians from the nearby reservations or Mexicans and Mexican Americans. Hearing both Spanish and English in my family, my child's mind believed all Spanish speakers to be Mexican. A few years later, I moved to the Midwest, where I was introduced to the Sunday afternoon matinee on television. During a broadcast of a John Wayne movie, I was surprised to see John Wayne as the cowboy and the Indians and Mexicans as the bad guys. One other Sunday afternoon, I watched West Side Story (1961), and I was delighted to be introduced to Puerto Ricans and find that Mexicans were not the only Spanish speakers in the world. This film offered two beautiful Puerto Rican women singing and dancing, and Natalie Wood and Rita Moreno became my heroes, until I found out that Natalie Wood was not Puerto Rican at all, but merely painted to appear so. Even in elementary school, I began to theorize about portrayals of Latinos in film and to notice their apparent absence. As I grew older and moved around the Midwest, as well http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Cinema Chicana: An Interview with Lourdes Portillo

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 62 (1) – Feb 21, 2010

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1934-6018
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Abstract

michelle j. martinez as a young girl in rural arizona, I attended rodeos where the majority of the cowboys were Indians from the nearby reservations or Mexicans and Mexican Americans. Hearing both Spanish and English in my family, my child's mind believed all Spanish speakers to be Mexican. A few years later, I moved to the Midwest, where I was introduced to the Sunday afternoon matinee on television. During a broadcast of a John Wayne movie, I was surprised to see John Wayne as the cowboy and the Indians and Mexicans as the bad guys. One other Sunday afternoon, I watched West Side Story (1961), and I was delighted to be introduced to Puerto Ricans and find that Mexicans were not the only Spanish speakers in the world. This film offered two beautiful Puerto Rican women singing and dancing, and Natalie Wood and Rita Moreno became my heroes, until I found out that Natalie Wood was not Puerto Rican at all, but merely painted to appear so. Even in elementary school, I began to theorize about portrayals of Latinos in film and to notice their apparent absence. As I grew older and moved around the Midwest, as well

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 21, 2010

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