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Buster Keaton and the Near-Miss Gag

Buster Keaton and the Near-Miss Gag william o. huie jr. buster ke aton’s most spec tacul ar gag— sion of Keaton’s comedy, especially gags such and surely one of the most dangerous movie as this one. Knopf explains the falling facade stunts ever executed—was staged in 1927 gag as a continuation of Keaton’s practice toward the end of production of his last inde­ of doing his own stunts and filming them in pendent feature film, Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928). such a way—using long, uncut takes—that the As we see it in the film, Buster is standing in viewers have no doubt about their authentic­ front of a two­ story house during a violent wind­ ity and about Keaton’s bravery in undertaking storm, and the whole front of the house comes them. He also notes that a long­ running visual loose and falls forward. Buster, who is facing motif throughout many of Keaton’s films shows away from the house, does not see it coming, Buster passing through windows and doors but we do. As it crashes to the ground, we see (Knopf 100–01). He discusses these traits in that a small attic window falls right over the the context of vaudeville traditions that Keaton spot where http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Buster Keaton and the Near-Miss Gag

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 69 (4) – Nov 18, 2017

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018

Abstract

william o. huie jr. buster ke aton’s most spec tacul ar gag— sion of Keaton’s comedy, especially gags such and surely one of the most dangerous movie as this one. Knopf explains the falling facade stunts ever executed—was staged in 1927 gag as a continuation of Keaton’s practice toward the end of production of his last inde­ of doing his own stunts and filming them in pendent feature film, Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928). such a way—using long, uncut takes—that the As we see it in the film, Buster is standing in viewers have no doubt about their authentic­ front of a two­ story house during a violent wind­ ity and about Keaton’s bravery in undertaking storm, and the whole front of the house comes them. He also notes that a long­ running visual loose and falls forward. Buster, who is facing motif throughout many of Keaton’s films shows away from the house, does not see it coming, Buster passing through windows and doors but we do. As it crashes to the ground, we see (Knopf 100–01). He discusses these traits in that a small attic window falls right over the the context of vaudeville traditions that Keaton spot where

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Nov 18, 2017

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