Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Bollywood Goes to the Stadium: Gender, National Identity, and Sport Film in Hindi

Bollywood Goes to the Stadium: Gender, National Identity, and Sport Film in Hindi amy j. ransom Bollywood gives cinematic substance, form, and historical context to the dream of the nation . . . --Grant Farred (72) the l ast ten years have witnessed the phenomenal expansion of India's unique, Mumbaibased Hindilanguage film industry, commonly referred to as Bollywood, into hith ertountapped world movie markets. Though popular throughout Asia and even in the East ern bloc since the 1950s, only recently has In dian film achieved mass popularity in the West. Its recent hegemonic internationalization can be attributed to a mutually beneficial feedback loop between changing strategies within Bom bay's film industry to appeal to Indian diasporic communities abroad, coupled with Bollywood's increased exposure to nondiasporic audiences in Europe and North America (Bhaumik 191; Ganti 3­6; Gehlawat 139; Joshi 41). As Kaushik Bhaumik observes, "the recent twin successes of Lagaan (Ashutosh Gowarikar, 2002) and Devdas (Sanjay Leela Bhansali, 2001) amongst a relatively substantial crossover audience in the West ensured that the presence of Bombay films has begun to get felt more palpably in the mainstream" (192). In addition to an increased presence on cinema screens, television broad casts of Bollywood films on specialized chan nels in the United Kingdom and Canada, as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Bollywood Goes to the Stadium: Gender, National Identity, and Sport Film in Hindi

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 66 (4) – Nov 27, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/bollywood-goes-to-the-stadium-gender-national-identity-and-sport-film-OnNukvNBWQ
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

amy j. ransom Bollywood gives cinematic substance, form, and historical context to the dream of the nation . . . --Grant Farred (72) the l ast ten years have witnessed the phenomenal expansion of India's unique, Mumbaibased Hindilanguage film industry, commonly referred to as Bollywood, into hith ertountapped world movie markets. Though popular throughout Asia and even in the East ern bloc since the 1950s, only recently has In dian film achieved mass popularity in the West. Its recent hegemonic internationalization can be attributed to a mutually beneficial feedback loop between changing strategies within Bom bay's film industry to appeal to Indian diasporic communities abroad, coupled with Bollywood's increased exposure to nondiasporic audiences in Europe and North America (Bhaumik 191; Ganti 3­6; Gehlawat 139; Joshi 41). As Kaushik Bhaumik observes, "the recent twin successes of Lagaan (Ashutosh Gowarikar, 2002) and Devdas (Sanjay Leela Bhansali, 2001) amongst a relatively substantial crossover audience in the West ensured that the presence of Bombay films has begun to get felt more palpably in the mainstream" (192). In addition to an increased presence on cinema screens, television broad casts of Bollywood films on specialized chan nels in the United Kingdom and Canada, as

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Nov 27, 2014

There are no references for this article.