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Authors of the Image: Cinematographers Gabriel Figueroa and Gregg Toland

Authors of the Image: Cinematographers Gabriel Figueroa and Gregg Toland evan lieberman and kerry hegarty in accepting the mexican national award for Science and Art in 1971, cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa spoke of the great privilege of "translating the world through the camera," of penetrating "the heart of reality" to explore the questions of the human soul, of "telling stories, evoking history, and making history."1 This sweeping sentiment reflects one of the fundamental tenets in the study of national cinemas: the idea that filmmakers take the tensions, the conflicts, the ideals-- essentially the entire culture--of their historical moment and distill it into sounds and images that reflect a particular understanding of their time and place. Much of the study of the moving image is, in fact, predicated on the basic assumption that images (in film, television, or even video games) both reflect and create a society's set of dominant values, as well as reveal the contradictions and fissures inherent in those values. It is not surprising, therefore, that questions of authorship are so important to the field. To understand the individuals responsible for constructing this feedback loop of moving image and society, these interpreters evan lieberman is an associate professor of film studies and production at Cleveland State University. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Authors of the Image: Cinematographers Gabriel Figueroa and Gregg Toland

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 62 (1) – Feb 21, 2010

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1934-6018
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Abstract

evan lieberman and kerry hegarty in accepting the mexican national award for Science and Art in 1971, cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa spoke of the great privilege of "translating the world through the camera," of penetrating "the heart of reality" to explore the questions of the human soul, of "telling stories, evoking history, and making history."1 This sweeping sentiment reflects one of the fundamental tenets in the study of national cinemas: the idea that filmmakers take the tensions, the conflicts, the ideals-- essentially the entire culture--of their historical moment and distill it into sounds and images that reflect a particular understanding of their time and place. Much of the study of the moving image is, in fact, predicated on the basic assumption that images (in film, television, or even video games) both reflect and create a society's set of dominant values, as well as reveal the contradictions and fissures inherent in those values. It is not surprising, therefore, that questions of authorship are so important to the field. To understand the individuals responsible for constructing this feedback loop of moving image and society, these interpreters evan lieberman is an associate professor of film studies and production at Cleveland State University.

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 21, 2010

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