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Are the “Boys” at Pixar Afraid of Little Girls?

Are the “Boys” at Pixar Afraid of Little Girls? haseenah ebrahim "Pixar has a girl problem. --Joel Stein, Time magazine (38) Until I visited Pixar's offices, I did not know that 12-year-old boys were allowed to run major corporations. --Joel Stein, Time magazine (37) christian metz's observation that "a film is difficult to explain because it is easy to understand" (69) appears particularly evident when one is teaching an undergraduate course on the animated feature films of Disney and Pixar. In a recent class taught in Chicago,1 many students were taken aback when they learned that the course involved historical, sociological, and theoretical framing and analysis. The students, it turned out, expected little more than discussions of the animated films' plot events, some character and stylistic analysis, and the role of hand-drawn versus computer-generated (CG) animation in a film's popular appeal. In addition, a refrain began to emerge--namely, "I love Disney films, but I never thought of them as being ideological." In some instances, I sensed a hint of disapproval that the course would subject Disney and Pixar to the kind of analysis that might require students to reevaluate much-loved films associated with cherished memories of childhood. I reiterated the argument I make every time I teach http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Are the “Boys” at Pixar Afraid of Little Girls?

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 66 (3) – Aug 29, 2014

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

haseenah ebrahim "Pixar has a girl problem. --Joel Stein, Time magazine (38) Until I visited Pixar's offices, I did not know that 12-year-old boys were allowed to run major corporations. --Joel Stein, Time magazine (37) christian metz's observation that "a film is difficult to explain because it is easy to understand" (69) appears particularly evident when one is teaching an undergraduate course on the animated feature films of Disney and Pixar. In a recent class taught in Chicago,1 many students were taken aback when they learned that the course involved historical, sociological, and theoretical framing and analysis. The students, it turned out, expected little more than discussions of the animated films' plot events, some character and stylistic analysis, and the role of hand-drawn versus computer-generated (CG) animation in a film's popular appeal. In addition, a refrain began to emerge--namely, "I love Disney films, but I never thought of them as being ideological." In some instances, I sensed a hint of disapproval that the course would subject Disney and Pixar to the kind of analysis that might require students to reevaluate much-loved films associated with cherished memories of childhood. I reiterated the argument I make every time I teach

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 29, 2014

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