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Aedificia Nova: Studies in Honor of Rosemary Cramp (review)

Aedificia Nova: Studies in Honor of Rosemary Cramp (review) other texts--Latin and vernacular--that were composed, copied, and used. The Handlist's overriding aim and its chief virtue is its inclusiveness: unlike the more detailed catalogues of Wanley and Ker, it is not confined to manuscripts containing Anglo-Saxon but to the whole range of surviving books that were produced or owned in England before 1100. All the contributions display a scrupulous attention to detail, and the volume as a whole is very carefully produced and well-designed. I found very few errors, just a couple of which might lead readers astray. Scragg's footnote 2 (p. 22) should be to N. R. Ker's Catalogue of Manuscripts containing Anglo-Saxon (not his English Manuscripts in the Century after the Norman Conquest), and, pace Hall, pp. 31 and 42, there is no evidence that Paul the Deacon's homiliary was compiled for reading in the monastic night office specifically, if "monastic" in this context is understood to refer to the cursus outlined in the Benedictine rule rather than also to the secular "Roman" cursus (itself monastic in origin). Instead, Charlemagne, in his letter "to the lectors" (MGH Cap. I, no. 30, pp. 80­81), authorized the homiliary's use in the night office in all the "churches http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic Philology University of Illinois Press

Aedificia Nova: Studies in Honor of Rosemary Cramp (review)

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-662X
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Abstract

other texts--Latin and vernacular--that were composed, copied, and used. The Handlist's overriding aim and its chief virtue is its inclusiveness: unlike the more detailed catalogues of Wanley and Ker, it is not confined to manuscripts containing Anglo-Saxon but to the whole range of surviving books that were produced or owned in England before 1100. All the contributions display a scrupulous attention to detail, and the volume as a whole is very carefully produced and well-designed. I found very few errors, just a couple of which might lead readers astray. Scragg's footnote 2 (p. 22) should be to N. R. Ker's Catalogue of Manuscripts containing Anglo-Saxon (not his English Manuscripts in the Century after the Norman Conquest), and, pace Hall, pp. 31 and 42, there is no evidence that Paul the Deacon's homiliary was compiled for reading in the monastic night office specifically, if "monastic" in this context is understood to refer to the cursus outlined in the Benedictine rule rather than also to the secular "Roman" cursus (itself monastic in origin). Instead, Charlemagne, in his letter "to the lectors" (MGH Cap. I, no. 30, pp. 80­81), authorized the homiliary's use in the night office in all the "churches

Journal

JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic PhilologyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 30, 2011

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