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"A Lot Up For Grabs": The Idiosyncratic, Syncretic Religious Temperament of Kate Chopin

"A Lot Up For Grabs": The Idiosyncratic, Syncretic Religious Temperament of Kate Chopin DAVID Z. Luis Buñuel and Ingmar Bergman represent "one of the most compelling, if uncategorizable, intellectual tendencies of the twentieth century: that of religious temperament without religious faith." --Carlos Fuentes A search for Kate Chopin's name in the online MLA Bibliography turns up 652 articles published over the past forty years, but only one--published in 1982 by a scholar at Loyola University--mentions Catholicism in its title.1 This void exists despite the fact that Chopin's family raised her as a practicing Catholic, she did all of her schooling in Catholic institutions, she went to communion on her honeymoon, and references to Christianity fill her work. Of her ninety-six short stories, she set five at Christmas and four at Easter, and religious diction suffuses all her stories: awakening, rapture, ecstasy, transfiguration, miracles, Christ, the Holy Ghost, Eve, and Assumption. The title of her most-studied novel, The Awakening, represents a trope that runs throughout Christian conversion narratives. The novel starts on a Sunday with most of the Grand Isle vacationers attending Mass, except for the protagonist, Edna Pontellier, and a week later on the next Sunday, Edna's awakening begins as she first realizes her feelings for Robert Lebrun. Edna's foil in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literary Realism University of Illinois Press

"A Lot Up For Grabs": The Idiosyncratic, Syncretic Religious Temperament of Kate Chopin

American Literary Realism , Volume 43 (2) – Jan 5, 2011

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University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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1940-5103
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Abstract

DAVID Z. Luis Buñuel and Ingmar Bergman represent "one of the most compelling, if uncategorizable, intellectual tendencies of the twentieth century: that of religious temperament without religious faith." --Carlos Fuentes A search for Kate Chopin's name in the online MLA Bibliography turns up 652 articles published over the past forty years, but only one--published in 1982 by a scholar at Loyola University--mentions Catholicism in its title.1 This void exists despite the fact that Chopin's family raised her as a practicing Catholic, she did all of her schooling in Catholic institutions, she went to communion on her honeymoon, and references to Christianity fill her work. Of her ninety-six short stories, she set five at Christmas and four at Easter, and religious diction suffuses all her stories: awakening, rapture, ecstasy, transfiguration, miracles, Christ, the Holy Ghost, Eve, and Assumption. The title of her most-studied novel, The Awakening, represents a trope that runs throughout Christian conversion narratives. The novel starts on a Sunday with most of the Grand Isle vacationers attending Mass, except for the protagonist, Edna Pontellier, and a week later on the next Sunday, Edna's awakening begins as she first realizes her feelings for Robert Lebrun. Edna's foil in

Journal

American Literary RealismUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jan 5, 2011

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