Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture by Wendy Larson (review)

Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture by Wendy Larson (review) Reviews 317 to the stereotypes they contained. In fact, this book also raises an extremely important question for historians; since eunuchs left practically no traces by themselves, the author had to rely on documents written by scholars who despised eunuchs and on crime reports they have committed, in order to decrypt their daily life and the various possibilities afforded to them under the Qing. Since these documents talk only about those who were transgressing the lines (or those who were caught doing so), and since, as the author mentioned, they were often filled with learned formulas, how could it be possible to account for the ordinary life of those who weren’t crossing the lines? This issue suggests that parts of uncharted areas of history are meant to be kept with a degree of uncertainty despite the creativity of researchers, especially when comes the time to tell the story of those who left little or no trace at all. However, despite the limits of the sources available, the interpretive analogy suggested by the author presents a realistic and detailed must-read answer to the question of what it meant to be a eunuch during the Qing: “It meant different things to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture by Wendy Larson (review)

China Review International, Volume 24 (4) – Dec 12, 2019

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 317 to the stereotypes they contained. In fact, this book also raises an extremely important question for historians; since eunuchs left practically no traces by themselves, the author had to rely on documents written by scholars who despised eunuchs and on crime reports they have committed, in order to decrypt their daily life and the various possibilities afforded to them under the Qing. Since these documents talk only about those who were transgressing the lines (or those who were caught doing so), and since, as the author mentioned, they were often filled with learned formulas, how could it be possible to account for the ordinary life of those who weren’t crossing the lines? This issue suggests that parts of uncharted areas of history are meant to be kept with a degree of uncertainty despite the creativity of researchers, especially when comes the time to tell the story of those who left little or no trace at all. However, despite the limits of the sources available, the interpretive analogy suggested by the author presents a realistic and detailed must-read answer to the question of what it meant to be a eunuch during the Qing: “It meant different things to

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 12, 2019

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