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Zen and the Kingdom of Heaven (review)

Zen and the Kingdom of Heaven (review) 4_133-201 9/3/03 7:31 AM Page 174 174 BOOK R EV I EWS descriptive or epistemological motivation that I’ve been describing. As such, his work suggests another way that philosophy has turned to religion, and is to be highly rec- ommended to those seeking resources for theologies that are both prophetic and mystical in the face of a world of Market-Gods and populations choking on pollu- tions both metaphorical and literal. Brian Karafin Ithaca College ZEN AND THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN. By Tom Chetwynd. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2001. 153 pp. Tom Chetwynd brings many strengths to his book of reflections on Zen and Chris- tianity. Because his most obvious strength is his craft as a professional writer, he offers us a book that is well written, carefully organized, and a pleasure to read. He divides his reflections into three parts: “Zen Experience,” “Christian Meditation in the Light of Zen,” and finally, “Christian Zen Practice.” It is especially in the first and third parts that the author is particularly helpful for Christians engaged in interfaith dia- logue. In part 1 Chetwynd’s reflections on the Zen experience are autobiographical. He tells us that he came to Zen as a committed adult Christian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Zen and the Kingdom of Heaven (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 23 – Oct 29, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

4_133-201 9/3/03 7:31 AM Page 174 174 BOOK R EV I EWS descriptive or epistemological motivation that I’ve been describing. As such, his work suggests another way that philosophy has turned to religion, and is to be highly rec- ommended to those seeking resources for theologies that are both prophetic and mystical in the face of a world of Market-Gods and populations choking on pollu- tions both metaphorical and literal. Brian Karafin Ithaca College ZEN AND THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN. By Tom Chetwynd. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2001. 153 pp. Tom Chetwynd brings many strengths to his book of reflections on Zen and Chris- tianity. Because his most obvious strength is his craft as a professional writer, he offers us a book that is well written, carefully organized, and a pleasure to read. He divides his reflections into three parts: “Zen Experience,” “Christian Meditation in the Light of Zen,” and finally, “Christian Zen Practice.” It is especially in the first and third parts that the author is particularly helpful for Christians engaged in interfaith dia- logue. In part 1 Chetwynd’s reflections on the Zen experience are autobiographical. He tells us that he came to Zen as a committed adult Christian

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 29, 2003

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