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Zarathustra's Sisters: Women's Autobiography and the Shaping of Cultural History (review)

Zarathustra's Sisters: Women's Autobiography and the Shaping of Cultural History (review) 09-Reviews (597-679) 10/5/04 12:13 PM Page 638 638 Biography 27.3 (Summer 2004) editing for the series than it is a criticism of the writer, but I definitely felt the lack of smooth thematic transitions within chapters to be annoying. While noting the gaps and structural irritants, I also find much to rec- ommend this book. The chapter on Woolf is particularly interesting, given that few critics talk about A Room of One’s Own as an example of life writ- ing per se. (I should note that parts of this and the chapter on Kingston appeared in a volume I co-edited with Laura Davis marking the seventh annual Woolf conference in 1997; it was interesting to see the full-chapter treatment of each text here.) Rusk is not afraid to call these writers on their own gaps and limitations; for example, she acknowledges Woolf ’s slippage into positions of class and imperial privilege, in spite of Woolf ’s condemna- tion of such privileges throughout the text. Rusk notes Woolf ’ s “dual posi- tion both within and outside ‘Whitehall’” (22), and allows this slippage to construct a more complex narrative self for Woolf. Rusk’s own critical voice is even and articulate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Zarathustra's Sisters: Women's Autobiography and the Shaping of Cultural History (review)

Biography , Volume 27 (3) – Nov 22, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

09-Reviews (597-679) 10/5/04 12:13 PM Page 638 638 Biography 27.3 (Summer 2004) editing for the series than it is a criticism of the writer, but I definitely felt the lack of smooth thematic transitions within chapters to be annoying. While noting the gaps and structural irritants, I also find much to rec- ommend this book. The chapter on Woolf is particularly interesting, given that few critics talk about A Room of One’s Own as an example of life writ- ing per se. (I should note that parts of this and the chapter on Kingston appeared in a volume I co-edited with Laura Davis marking the seventh annual Woolf conference in 1997; it was interesting to see the full-chapter treatment of each text here.) Rusk is not afraid to call these writers on their own gaps and limitations; for example, she acknowledges Woolf ’s slippage into positions of class and imperial privilege, in spite of Woolf ’s condemna- tion of such privileges throughout the text. Rusk notes Woolf ’ s “dual posi- tion both within and outside ‘Whitehall’” (22), and allows this slippage to construct a more complex narrative self for Woolf. Rusk’s own critical voice is even and articulate.

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 22, 2004

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