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Yellowface: Creating the Chinese in American Popular Music and Performance, 1850s-1920s (review)

Yellowface: Creating the Chinese in American Popular Music and Performance, 1850s-1920s (review) them. Terminology and character and place names are provided both in Chinese characters and romanized, a great boon for scholars wishing to identify correct sources of nomenclature. When necessary, Chen corrects a word or character reference in the hand-copied play scripts, explaining her rationale in the footnotes. The seven plays contain themes drawn from domestic farce (Henpecked Zhang San and the delightfully titled Rotten-Kid Dong Sells His Ma), literary romance (The White Jade Hairpin), and crowd-pleasing military adventure (Yang Long Draws the Bow). Most scripts are direct translations of a single text, although Chen created a composite of two scripts and a performance transcription in order to produce The Temple of Guanyin. This play itself has an interesting history: it began as a secular tale of a woman warrior to which religious elements were introduced so as to make it appropriate for performances on the birthday of Guanyin, the goddess of mercy. A subtitled video of The Temple of Guanyin, also available through Chen (fanchen@albany.edu), may be used in combination with the book and is an especially useful teaching tool. It is fortunate that this footage exists; at the time of the performance, the piece had not been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Yellowface: Creating the Chinese in American Popular Music and Performance, 1850s-1920s (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 23 (1) – Apr 12, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

them. Terminology and character and place names are provided both in Chinese characters and romanized, a great boon for scholars wishing to identify correct sources of nomenclature. When necessary, Chen corrects a word or character reference in the hand-copied play scripts, explaining her rationale in the footnotes. The seven plays contain themes drawn from domestic farce (Henpecked Zhang San and the delightfully titled Rotten-Kid Dong Sells His Ma), literary romance (The White Jade Hairpin), and crowd-pleasing military adventure (Yang Long Draws the Bow). Most scripts are direct translations of a single text, although Chen created a composite of two scripts and a performance transcription in order to produce The Temple of Guanyin. This play itself has an interesting history: it began as a secular tale of a woman warrior to which religious elements were introduced so as to make it appropriate for performances on the birthday of Guanyin, the goddess of mercy. A subtitled video of The Temple of Guanyin, also available through Chen (fanchen@albany.edu), may be used in combination with the book and is an especially useful teaching tool. It is fortunate that this footage exists; at the time of the performance, the piece had not been

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 12, 2006

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