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Yellow Perils: China Narratives in the Contemporary World ed. by Franck Billé and Sören Urbansky (review)

Yellow Perils: China Narratives in the Contemporary World ed. by Franck Billé and Sören... 108 China Review International: Vol. 24, No. 2, 2017 suffering in purgatory. Mulian is here portrayed as an underworld savior for all the pious, cooperating with the Venerable Unborn Mother of sectarian mythology. The author also discusses the influence in some later baojuan related to Mulian of the “inner elixir” Neidan teachings of some Daoist groups. For those interested, there is a long translated passage about this on page 109. The Many Faces of Mulian continues with detailed discussions of nineteenth century precious volumes based on and modifying this story, and provides descriptions of Mulian-related rituals observed by the author in Jiangsu. These fieldwork reports are a precious example of an ancient popular tradition still being performed today. Great stuff! The book includes a detailed bibliography of studies of its topic in several languages. This is a fine study, a pleasure to read. I found only one typo, Tree for Three on p. 99. Daniel L. Overmyer Daniel L. Overmyer, FRSC, is Professor Emeritus of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, who taught Chinese language, philosophy, and religion there from 1973 to 2001. Before that he taught for three years at Oberlin College. Franck Billé and Sören http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Yellow Perils: China Narratives in the Contemporary World ed. by Franck Billé and Sören Urbansky (review)

China Review International , Volume 24 (2) – Jun 4, 2019

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

108 China Review International: Vol. 24, No. 2, 2017 suffering in purgatory. Mulian is here portrayed as an underworld savior for all the pious, cooperating with the Venerable Unborn Mother of sectarian mythology. The author also discusses the influence in some later baojuan related to Mulian of the “inner elixir” Neidan teachings of some Daoist groups. For those interested, there is a long translated passage about this on page 109. The Many Faces of Mulian continues with detailed discussions of nineteenth century precious volumes based on and modifying this story, and provides descriptions of Mulian-related rituals observed by the author in Jiangsu. These fieldwork reports are a precious example of an ancient popular tradition still being performed today. Great stuff! The book includes a detailed bibliography of studies of its topic in several languages. This is a fine study, a pleasure to read. I found only one typo, Tree for Three on p. 99. Daniel L. Overmyer Daniel L. Overmyer, FRSC, is Professor Emeritus of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, who taught Chinese language, philosophy, and religion there from 1973 to 2001. Before that he taught for three years at Oberlin College. Franck Billé and Sören

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 4, 2019

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