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Xuanzang: A Buddhist Pilgrim on the Silk Road (review)

Xuanzang: A Buddhist Pilgrim on the Silk Road (review) Reviews 581 Sally Hovey Wriggins. Xuanzang: A Buddhist Pilgrim on the Silk Road. With a foreword by Frederick W. Mote. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1996. xxiv, 263 pp. Hardcover $32.50, isbn 0-8133-2801-2. Scholars have long recognized the importance of travel accounts to the study of geography, history, ethnography, and related disciplines. And while innumerable travel accounts have served as sources of information for both general readers and researchers, a small number of them stand out as particularly important due to the wealth of material that they contain. The two works focusing on the travels of the seventh-century Chinese pilgrim Xuanzang (Hsiian-tsang, also known in some works as Tripitaka)--that is, his own account and the biography written by his younger contemporary, the monk Huili--surely are to be included in that elite group. Xuanzang's travels from China through Inner Asia to India and back, including extensive travel within the subcontinent itself, began in 629 c.e. and ended sixteen years later. His account of this journey, and the complementary account by Huili, contain information that is to be found in no other source. The very scale of Xuanzang's travels elicits admiration; the fact that he (and Huili) described these travels in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Xuanzang: A Buddhist Pilgrim on the Silk Road (review)

China Review International , Volume 4 (2) – Mar 30, 1997

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

Reviews 581 Sally Hovey Wriggins. Xuanzang: A Buddhist Pilgrim on the Silk Road. With a foreword by Frederick W. Mote. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1996. xxiv, 263 pp. Hardcover $32.50, isbn 0-8133-2801-2. Scholars have long recognized the importance of travel accounts to the study of geography, history, ethnography, and related disciplines. And while innumerable travel accounts have served as sources of information for both general readers and researchers, a small number of them stand out as particularly important due to the wealth of material that they contain. The two works focusing on the travels of the seventh-century Chinese pilgrim Xuanzang (Hsiian-tsang, also known in some works as Tripitaka)--that is, his own account and the biography written by his younger contemporary, the monk Huili--surely are to be included in that elite group. Xuanzang's travels from China through Inner Asia to India and back, including extensive travel within the subcontinent itself, began in 629 c.e. and ended sixteen years later. His account of this journey, and the complementary account by Huili, contain information that is to be found in no other source. The very scale of Xuanzang's travels elicits admiration; the fact that he (and Huili) described these travels in

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1997

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