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Writing the Roaming Subject: The Biotext in Canadian Literature (review)

Writing the Roaming Subject: The Biotext in Canadian Literature (review) 400 Biography 30.3 (Summer 2007) Joanne Saul. Writing the Roaming Subject: The Biotext in Canadian Literature. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2006. 175 pp. ISBN 0-802-09012-5, $45.00. Joanne Saul offers a cogent examination of four contemporary Canadi- an authors—Michael Ondaatje, Daphne Marlatt, Roy Kiyooka, and Fred Wah —who all work repeatedly and innovatively with various auto/biogra- phy genres. Canada has a long, diverse, and rich history of life writing, yet scholarly attention to Canadian materials remains rather thin on the ground. Thus, almost any contribution to Canadian auto/biography studies is wel- come. Certainly a few important collections of essays have been published in the past couple of decades (see Egan and Helms, Neuman, Rak), but more rare are book-length monographs that focus solely on Canadian works (see Buss). In a monograph, the critic has the opportunity to locate particular au- thors and works in broader theoretical, national, and cultural contexts, and in that sense Saul’s Writing the Roaming Subject is highly comprehensive. Her range of subject is both wide (in that she considers life-writing texts authored by women and men of diverse ethnicities) and narrow (in that the temporal focus is on autobiographical texts published in the 1980s and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Writing the Roaming Subject: The Biotext in Canadian Literature (review)

Biography , Volume 30 (3) – Oct 1, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

400 Biography 30.3 (Summer 2007) Joanne Saul. Writing the Roaming Subject: The Biotext in Canadian Literature. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2006. 175 pp. ISBN 0-802-09012-5, $45.00. Joanne Saul offers a cogent examination of four contemporary Canadi- an authors—Michael Ondaatje, Daphne Marlatt, Roy Kiyooka, and Fred Wah —who all work repeatedly and innovatively with various auto/biogra- phy genres. Canada has a long, diverse, and rich history of life writing, yet scholarly attention to Canadian materials remains rather thin on the ground. Thus, almost any contribution to Canadian auto/biography studies is wel- come. Certainly a few important collections of essays have been published in the past couple of decades (see Egan and Helms, Neuman, Rak), but more rare are book-length monographs that focus solely on Canadian works (see Buss). In a monograph, the critic has the opportunity to locate particular au- thors and works in broader theoretical, national, and cultural contexts, and in that sense Saul’s Writing the Roaming Subject is highly comprehensive. Her range of subject is both wide (in that she considers life-writing texts authored by women and men of diverse ethnicities) and narrow (in that the temporal focus is on autobiographical texts published in the 1980s and

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2007

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