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Writing Medieval Biography: Essays in Honour of Frank Barlow (review)

Writing Medieval Biography: Essays in Honour of Frank Barlow (review) Reviews 387 full employment. In the aftermath of German bombing, reconstruction on the Home Front was an issue as it had not been after the First World War. The context within which death was redeemed had changed, as had the meanings that could be constructed, but individuals still sought purpose in the loss of life. Winter knows this as well as anyone: it is to his credit that in attempting to cover such a broad sweep, he leaves so few hostages to fortune. Winter is strong on the essential contradiction of remembrance: despite all the assertions that the dead will be remembered, the passage of time means they are ultimately destined to be forgotten, and in most cases sooner rather than later. Remembrance always fails. This message might seem realistic, but downbeat. For historians, however, this is ultimately an optimistic book. In the war between “history” and “memory,” Winter suggests that by know- ing our enemy and seeking to influence it using its own weapons, we might achieve a sort of victory. Daniel Todman David Bates, Julia Crick, and Sarah Hamilton, eds. Writing Medieval Biogra- phy: Essays in Honour of Frank Barlow. Woodbridge: Boydell, 2006. 262 pp. ISBN 184-38-3262-3, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Writing Medieval Biography: Essays in Honour of Frank Barlow (review)

Biography , Volume 30 (3) – Oct 1, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

Reviews 387 full employment. In the aftermath of German bombing, reconstruction on the Home Front was an issue as it had not been after the First World War. The context within which death was redeemed had changed, as had the meanings that could be constructed, but individuals still sought purpose in the loss of life. Winter knows this as well as anyone: it is to his credit that in attempting to cover such a broad sweep, he leaves so few hostages to fortune. Winter is strong on the essential contradiction of remembrance: despite all the assertions that the dead will be remembered, the passage of time means they are ultimately destined to be forgotten, and in most cases sooner rather than later. Remembrance always fails. This message might seem realistic, but downbeat. For historians, however, this is ultimately an optimistic book. In the war between “history” and “memory,” Winter suggests that by know- ing our enemy and seeking to influence it using its own weapons, we might achieve a sort of victory. Daniel Todman David Bates, Julia Crick, and Sarah Hamilton, eds. Writing Medieval Biogra- phy: Essays in Honour of Frank Barlow. Woodbridge: Boydell, 2006. 262 pp. ISBN 184-38-3262-3,

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2007

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