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Worlds Apart: A History of the Pacific Islands (review)

Worlds Apart: A History of the Pacific Islands (review) 482 the contemporary pacific • 17:2 (2005) Any study of how Western knowledge identification. It is indeed refreshing depicted and understood Melanesia to see so many maps in one place that must examine the representations and show the whole island, not chopped the political power they express. With off at 141 degrees of longitude! New Guinea, this is complicated by a The lack of such truncation, in western differentiation between the scope of discussion as well as literally Malay and Melanesian cultures, and on the maps themselves, should make also by Indonesian (mainly Javanese) New Guinea: Crossing Boundaries conceptions of Melanesia as more and History a valuable tool for gen- primitive than the Malay cultural eral readers as well as scholars and area. Added to this are Australian teachers, providing a clear survey of conceptions of differences between New Guinea’s historical and cultural the Aboriginal and New Guinea developments across the whole island cultures” (183–184). and within its larger global and tem- Moore predicts that “the Indone- poral contexts. sianization of west New Guinea— the larry m lake introduction of a Malay population Messiah College through transmigrasi and casual migration— must eventually, during *** the next century or two, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Worlds Apart: A History of the Pacific Islands (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 17 (2) – Jul 29, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

482 the contemporary pacific • 17:2 (2005) Any study of how Western knowledge identification. It is indeed refreshing depicted and understood Melanesia to see so many maps in one place that must examine the representations and show the whole island, not chopped the political power they express. With off at 141 degrees of longitude! New Guinea, this is complicated by a The lack of such truncation, in western differentiation between the scope of discussion as well as literally Malay and Melanesian cultures, and on the maps themselves, should make also by Indonesian (mainly Javanese) New Guinea: Crossing Boundaries conceptions of Melanesia as more and History a valuable tool for gen- primitive than the Malay cultural eral readers as well as scholars and area. Added to this are Australian teachers, providing a clear survey of conceptions of differences between New Guinea’s historical and cultural the Aboriginal and New Guinea developments across the whole island cultures” (183–184). and within its larger global and tem- Moore predicts that “the Indone- poral contexts. sianization of west New Guinea— the larry m lake introduction of a Malay population Messiah College through transmigrasi and casual migration— must eventually, during *** the next century or two,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 29, 2005

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