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Working Against Odds: Stories of Disabled Women's Work Lives (review)

Working Against Odds: Stories of Disabled Women's Work Lives (review) 04-Reviews 8/23/05 9:19 AM Page 447 Reviews 447 generic adventure, and thereby assumes the active participation of the writer in the construction of both her gender and her identity. Chu-Chueh Cheng’s examination of “the treacherousness of travel writing as a literary genre” demonstrates how this boundary-crossing genre can “render visible . . . the problematic of writing,” exposing both the intended and unintended in the travel writer’s self-representation, while Sarah Brusky’s intriguing analysis of Nancy Prince’s sophisticated turn on the “gothic” reminds us that the genre may be treacherous, but also offers opportunities to subjects in formation. Rosetta R. Haynes’s careful rendering of the means by which Zilpha Elaw creates her radical subjectivity through her revision of sentimental writing similarly works to show the genre’s ability to be molded by new hands. Heidi Slettedahl Macpherson treats travel writing as a form of postmodern critique, whereby the commonplace “fluid identity” that has seemed so linked to mas- culine plots in contemporary theorizing can be relocated in new female gen- dered plots, which deconstruct the masculine emphasis of much postmodern critical work. Corinne Fowler’s assessment of the ways in which the problems of “narrative authority,” along with travel writing’s troubled location http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Working Against Odds: Stories of Disabled Women's Work Lives (review)

Biography , Volume 28 (3) – Oct 4, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

04-Reviews 8/23/05 9:19 AM Page 447 Reviews 447 generic adventure, and thereby assumes the active participation of the writer in the construction of both her gender and her identity. Chu-Chueh Cheng’s examination of “the treacherousness of travel writing as a literary genre” demonstrates how this boundary-crossing genre can “render visible . . . the problematic of writing,” exposing both the intended and unintended in the travel writer’s self-representation, while Sarah Brusky’s intriguing analysis of Nancy Prince’s sophisticated turn on the “gothic” reminds us that the genre may be treacherous, but also offers opportunities to subjects in formation. Rosetta R. Haynes’s careful rendering of the means by which Zilpha Elaw creates her radical subjectivity through her revision of sentimental writing similarly works to show the genre’s ability to be molded by new hands. Heidi Slettedahl Macpherson treats travel writing as a form of postmodern critique, whereby the commonplace “fluid identity” that has seemed so linked to mas- culine plots in contemporary theorizing can be relocated in new female gen- dered plots, which deconstruct the masculine emphasis of much postmodern critical work. Corinne Fowler’s assessment of the ways in which the problems of “narrative authority,” along with travel writing’s troubled location

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 4, 2005

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