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Women's Gidayu and the Japanese Theatre Tradition (review)

Women's Gidayu and the Japanese Theatre Tradition (review) WOMEN'S GIDAYÜ AND THE JAPANESE THEATRE TRADITION. By A. Kimi Coaldrake. New York: Routledge, 1997. 262 pp. plus 10-track CD. Cloth $74.99 Gidayü narration, consisting of a gidayü narrator and a samisen accompanist, is well known as an integral part of Japanese all-male bunraku puppet performances. The tradition of females performing gidayü, which has existed as long as the male tradition, is not as well known. Women, though banned from the public stage from the 1620s to 1870, performed gidayü in private salons and in the teahouses of the licensed prostitution quarters. Soon after the Meiji government lifted the ban on women's public performances in 1870, women's gidayü, performed concert-style in music halls, without puppets, became an extremely popular entertainment. In fact, female gidayü performers were the very first Japanese pop music idols. The "musume gidayü" (girl gidayü) boom continued until the 1920s. Women's gidayü is now a highly respected genre of traditional performance and has many skilled practitioners. A. Kimi Coaldrake's study of women's gidayü is the first comprehensive study of this topic in any language. The broad scope of her study ties together such diverse topics as the history of women's gidayü, the social organization of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Women's Gidayu and the Japanese Theatre Tradition (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 17 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

WOMEN'S GIDAYÜ AND THE JAPANESE THEATRE TRADITION. By A. Kimi Coaldrake. New York: Routledge, 1997. 262 pp. plus 10-track CD. Cloth $74.99 Gidayü narration, consisting of a gidayü narrator and a samisen accompanist, is well known as an integral part of Japanese all-male bunraku puppet performances. The tradition of females performing gidayü, which has existed as long as the male tradition, is not as well known. Women, though banned from the public stage from the 1620s to 1870, performed gidayü in private salons and in the teahouses of the licensed prostitution quarters. Soon after the Meiji government lifted the ban on women's public performances in 1870, women's gidayü, performed concert-style in music halls, without puppets, became an extremely popular entertainment. In fact, female gidayü performers were the very first Japanese pop music idols. The "musume gidayü" (girl gidayü) boom continued until the 1920s. Women's gidayü is now a highly respected genre of traditional performance and has many skilled practitioners. A. Kimi Coaldrake's study of women's gidayü is the first comprehensive study of this topic in any language. The broad scope of her study ties together such diverse topics as the history of women's gidayü, the social organization of

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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