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Without Buddha I Could not Be a Christian (review)

Without Buddha I Could not Be a Christian (review) BOOK REVIEWS determiner of the new myths. Even if we grant that a dominant Western scientific origin account is a universally accessible narrative that provides common ground for the world religions, still other postmodernist concerns prevail. One is an unspoken presumption of far more consensus within religious traditions than is perhaps justifiable--and perhaps a related assumption that religious cosmogonies are actually about origins in the same sense that the sciences are about emergence. After all, we do not typically agree with scientific creationists that empirical scientific evidence is necessary for understanding the religious meaning of Christian scriptures. The other is the correct presumption that scientific consensus supports both Big Bang cosmology and evolutionary theory, which lives in tension with recognizing the postmodern character of the sciences. At this point, the argument begun in chapter 1 is in tension with the claims in chapter 6 about the partisan and perspectival nature of science, which is culturally, politically, and ideologically shaped (p. 122). The discussion of the perspectival character of science is made in the section of the book (pp. 122 f f.), exploring how Buddhism and Christianity might make substantial contributions to the natural sciences in the problem-solving, developmental, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Without Buddha I Could not Be a Christian (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 30 (1) – Sep 30, 2010

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS determiner of the new myths. Even if we grant that a dominant Western scientific origin account is a universally accessible narrative that provides common ground for the world religions, still other postmodernist concerns prevail. One is an unspoken presumption of far more consensus within religious traditions than is perhaps justifiable--and perhaps a related assumption that religious cosmogonies are actually about origins in the same sense that the sciences are about emergence. After all, we do not typically agree with scientific creationists that empirical scientific evidence is necessary for understanding the religious meaning of Christian scriptures. The other is the correct presumption that scientific consensus supports both Big Bang cosmology and evolutionary theory, which lives in tension with recognizing the postmodern character of the sciences. At this point, the argument begun in chapter 1 is in tension with the claims in chapter 6 about the partisan and perspectival nature of science, which is culturally, politically, and ideologically shaped (p. 122). The discussion of the perspectival character of science is made in the section of the book (pp. 122 f f.), exploring how Buddhism and Christianity might make substantial contributions to the natural sciences in the problem-solving, developmental,

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 30, 2010

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