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Where the Rivers Meet--Fiji: A Divided Community and its Struggle for Peace (review)

Where the Rivers Meet--Fiji: A Divided Community and its Struggle for Peace (review) book and media reviews such injuries and illnesses prevent some women from returning to work. Management refuses to reduce the amount of standing and heavy lifting when a worker is pregnant. The pa f c o women who share their experiences in the film add their voices to the chorus of women protesting similar wages and conditions in laborintensive, export-oriented factories worldwide. The implications for local gender relations of women's entry into factory employment are also addressed. A pa f c o job presented a new kind of freedom for women--to earn a wage and to establish new social networks with other workers. Despite the reversal of usual dependencies with many women now being their family's principal wage-earner, men have proved reluctant to take on housework and caregiving tasks. The workers explain how pa f c o management, formerly understanding about women's need to stay home when a child was sick, no longer gives approval for such absences. Girls' education is affected as girls arrive late to school or leave early to carry out domestic responsibilities in lieu of their working mothers. In other cases, women workers must risk pa f c o reprisals and stay home to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Where the Rivers Meet--Fiji: A Divided Community and its Struggle for Peace (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (2) – Jan 7, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews such injuries and illnesses prevent some women from returning to work. Management refuses to reduce the amount of standing and heavy lifting when a worker is pregnant. The pa f c o women who share their experiences in the film add their voices to the chorus of women protesting similar wages and conditions in laborintensive, export-oriented factories worldwide. The implications for local gender relations of women's entry into factory employment are also addressed. A pa f c o job presented a new kind of freedom for women--to earn a wage and to establish new social networks with other workers. Despite the reversal of usual dependencies with many women now being their family's principal wage-earner, men have proved reluctant to take on housework and caregiving tasks. The workers explain how pa f c o management, formerly understanding about women's need to stay home when a child was sick, no longer gives approval for such absences. Girls' education is affected as girls arrive late to school or leave early to carry out domestic responsibilities in lieu of their working mothers. In other cases, women workers must risk pa f c o reprisals and stay home to

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2002

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