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When the Shark Bites (review)

When the Shark Bites (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2004 Let me not only celebrate the political and cultural levels of this book. On reading some of these poems I found the same delight in particulars as in reading Pablo Neruda's Maremoto Seaquake (1993). In the shallows of Waimänalo, Trask finds "caves / filled with / cooled lava / and little / sparkling fish" ("The Shallows," 52). In "Run into the Sea," we're immersed in "foam and plume," and "spume salting the wind" (55). She conjures the soul's leaping place for Hawaiians' ancestral Kahiki (Tahiti). It is here, in the poem's setting, that I wish to leave this review, in the homeland of eastern Polynesia, a paradise extolled as Rangiatea (also within the Tahitian group) by Mäori, a place where at least our souls are sovereign: "Blue, now gold / a great honu follows. / Beyond the leaping / point, our souls / depart. / More beautiful still" ("Together," 59). Stroke the words, dance in the light, join the circle of gods and people of this very fine and thoughtprovoking book. Night is a Sharkskin Drum are literally overwhelming--they have to be. The beat of the drum is loud and alive here, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

When the Shark Bites (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 16 (2) – Aug 31, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2004 Let me not only celebrate the political and cultural levels of this book. On reading some of these poems I found the same delight in particulars as in reading Pablo Neruda's Maremoto Seaquake (1993). In the shallows of Waimänalo, Trask finds "caves / filled with / cooled lava / and little / sparkling fish" ("The Shallows," 52). In "Run into the Sea," we're immersed in "foam and plume," and "spume salting the wind" (55). She conjures the soul's leaping place for Hawaiians' ancestral Kahiki (Tahiti). It is here, in the poem's setting, that I wish to leave this review, in the homeland of eastern Polynesia, a paradise extolled as Rangiatea (also within the Tahitian group) by Mäori, a place where at least our souls are sovereign: "Blue, now gold / a great honu follows. / Beyond the leaping / point, our souls / depart. / More beautiful still" ("Together," 59). Stroke the words, dance in the light, join the circle of gods and people of this very fine and thoughtprovoking book. Night is a Sharkskin Drum are literally overwhelming--they have to be. The beat of the drum is loud and alive here,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 31, 2004

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