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When London Was the Capital of America (review)

When London Was the Capital of America (review) journal of world history, march 2012 nobles and soldiers. These purveyors of false value, like the vellón, or cheap copper coins to which the Spanish Crown increasingly resorted as its expenses grew after 1600 and its supply of precious metals from the Indies shrank, drove out good money and valorous men alike in favor of cheap substitutes. While the moralists and intellectuals Vilches discusses did not arrive at a consensus regarding what to do about the crisis, their analyses agreed that New World gold was undermining true value--moral, cultural, and economic--in Spain. New World Gold is a rich book that scholars of early modern European culture and literature, as well as Atlantic World specialists, will find useful and intriguing. It could have used a stronger conclusion that did a better job of summing up and comparing the different strains of thought regarding value and gold among the numerous moralists, literary authors, and nascent political economists Vilches discusses in the book. Also welcome would have been a concluding discussion regarding the evolution of these debates in Spain about gold and valor in the later seventeenth century. As the Spanish Crown weakened and the economies of colonies in the New http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

When London Was the Capital of America (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (1) – Jun 15, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, march 2012 nobles and soldiers. These purveyors of false value, like the vellón, or cheap copper coins to which the Spanish Crown increasingly resorted as its expenses grew after 1600 and its supply of precious metals from the Indies shrank, drove out good money and valorous men alike in favor of cheap substitutes. While the moralists and intellectuals Vilches discusses did not arrive at a consensus regarding what to do about the crisis, their analyses agreed that New World gold was undermining true value--moral, cultural, and economic--in Spain. New World Gold is a rich book that scholars of early modern European culture and literature, as well as Atlantic World specialists, will find useful and intriguing. It could have used a stronger conclusion that did a better job of summing up and comparing the different strains of thought regarding value and gold among the numerous moralists, literary authors, and nascent political economists Vilches discusses in the book. Also welcome would have been a concluding discussion regarding the evolution of these debates in Spain about gold and valor in the later seventeenth century. As the Spanish Crown weakened and the economies of colonies in the New

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 15, 2012

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