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What the Fortune Teller Didn't Say (review)

What the Fortune Teller Didn't Say (review) gambler father is dying from injuries incurred in a motorcycle accident. The son ponders his relationship to, and the inßuence of, the man he never really knew and reconstructs the role that this man played in the life of his family. The narrative jumps from present to imagined past and back again, alternating between points of v i e w . ÒRed HairÓ is a fairly straightforward account of the sexual relations of a day laborer and the mysterious, insatiable red-haired woman he picks up at a bus stop. Although one Japanese critic called this story a depiction of Òthe harmonious feel- ing human beings get when they experience themselves as a part of nature,Ó dark currents run through the text. There are hints that the woman , who has abandoned her teacher-husband and children , is emotionally damaged. Each morning the cou- ple is awakened by the screams of the speed addict next door. With its occasional images of violence and spare plot, this story illustrates another aspect of Naka- gamiÕs work. Western readers have long consumed exotic images of g e i s h aa nds a m u r a i ;m o r e recently, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

What the Fortune Teller Didn't Say (review)

Manoa , Volume 13 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

gambler father is dying from injuries incurred in a motorcycle accident. The son ponders his relationship to, and the inßuence of, the man he never really knew and reconstructs the role that this man played in the life of his family. The narrative jumps from present to imagined past and back again, alternating between points of v i e w . ÒRed HairÓ is a fairly straightforward account of the sexual relations of a day laborer and the mysterious, insatiable red-haired woman he picks up at a bus stop. Although one Japanese critic called this story a depiction of Òthe harmonious feel- ing human beings get when they experience themselves as a part of nature,Ó dark currents run through the text. There are hints that the woman , who has abandoned her teacher-husband and children , is emotionally damaged. Each morning the cou- ple is awakened by the screams of the speed addict next door. With its occasional images of violence and spare plot, this story illustrates another aspect of Naka- gamiÕs work. Western readers have long consumed exotic images of g e i s h aa nds a m u r a i ;m o r e recently,

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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