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What Is Wrong with Us?

What Is Wrong with Us? WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE WORLD? Christianity and Buddhism, in diverse ways, assert a fundamental flaw in the human condition expressed by terms like “sin” or “delusion”—a flaw that we are largely unconscious of, which prevents us from noticing the extent to which we ourselves as individuals and societies contribute to the harms we see around us. In what ways are Christian or Buddhist diagnoses of a basic human flaw critical for understanding the causality of current world problems, such as growing social and economic inequalities, religious animosities, racism, environmental degradation, and violence? Can any of these problems be addressed without adequate consideration of such traditional diagnoses? If not, what specific Christian or Buddhist understandings of the human condition need to be raised up today to shed light on such problems? How might Buddhist and Christian perspectives challenge or complement each other? And how might these traditional perspectives on the human condition undergo reinterpretation when relating them to current problems? Roger Haight, SJ The Christian tradition contains several ways of thinking about an answer to this question. They have different contexts and perform different functions. I will point to five Christian approaches and indicate why one of them http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

What Is Wrong with Us?

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 37 – Oct 28, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE WORLD? Christianity and Buddhism, in diverse ways, assert a fundamental flaw in the human condition expressed by terms like “sin” or “delusion”—a flaw that we are largely unconscious of, which prevents us from noticing the extent to which we ourselves as individuals and societies contribute to the harms we see around us. In what ways are Christian or Buddhist diagnoses of a basic human flaw critical for understanding the causality of current world problems, such as growing social and economic inequalities, religious animosities, racism, environmental degradation, and violence? Can any of these problems be addressed without adequate consideration of such traditional diagnoses? If not, what specific Christian or Buddhist understandings of the human condition need to be raised up today to shed light on such problems? How might Buddhist and Christian perspectives challenge or complement each other? And how might these traditional perspectives on the human condition undergo reinterpretation when relating them to current problems? Roger Haight, SJ The Christian tradition contains several ways of thinking about an answer to this question. They have different contexts and perform different functions. I will point to five Christian approaches and indicate why one of them

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 28, 2017

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