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What Does It Mean to "Speak Truth to Power"?

What Does It Mean to "Speak Truth to Power"? FEATURE REVIEW VICI Project, University of Leiden Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School, and Co-Prosperity. By Christopher S. Goto-Jones. London and New York: Routledge, 2005. Pp. 192. Ever since the end of the ``Great East Asian War'' in Japan a debate has been smoldering over the contamination of philosophy by politics. This debate was sparked by a series of writings through which the ``father of Japanese philosophy,'' Nishida Kitaro (1870­1945), and some thinkers affiliated with him--the so-called Kyoto ¯ School--became involved in the politics connected with the war to establish a ``Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.'' The debate over Nishida and the Kyoto School has repeatedly been overshadowed by the debate over Heidegger. Aside from the strategic considerations of those engaged in the prosecution of the Kyoto School, one reason for the ``Heidegger factor''1 may have something to do with the fact that philosophical parallels can indeed be drawn between Nishida and Heidegger, and that there are also direct links between Nishida and some of his disciples who studied in Germany. Questions concerning Heidegger's political engagement are still explosive, even twenty years after Farias' attempt to prove Heidegger's entanglement with National Socialism. The publication of Emmanuel http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

What Does It Mean to "Speak Truth to Power"?

Philosophy East and West , Volume 56 (3) – Jul 20, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

FEATURE REVIEW VICI Project, University of Leiden Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School, and Co-Prosperity. By Christopher S. Goto-Jones. London and New York: Routledge, 2005. Pp. 192. Ever since the end of the ``Great East Asian War'' in Japan a debate has been smoldering over the contamination of philosophy by politics. This debate was sparked by a series of writings through which the ``father of Japanese philosophy,'' Nishida Kitaro (1870­1945), and some thinkers affiliated with him--the so-called Kyoto ¯ School--became involved in the politics connected with the war to establish a ``Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.'' The debate over Nishida and the Kyoto School has repeatedly been overshadowed by the debate over Heidegger. Aside from the strategic considerations of those engaged in the prosecution of the Kyoto School, one reason for the ``Heidegger factor''1 may have something to do with the fact that philosophical parallels can indeed be drawn between Nishida and Heidegger, and that there are also direct links between Nishida and some of his disciples who studied in Germany. Questions concerning Heidegger's political engagement are still explosive, even twenty years after Farias' attempt to prove Heidegger's entanglement with National Socialism. The publication of Emmanuel

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 20, 2006

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