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"We Drank Many Gin and Tonics": Desire and Enchantment in Merton's Buddhist Pilgrimage

"We Drank Many Gin and Tonics": Desire and Enchantment in Merton's Buddhist Pilgrimage “We Drank Many Gin and Tonics”: Desire and Enchantment in Merton’s Buddhist Pilgrimage Jack Downey La Salle University This is the darkest hour of the dark ages. Disease, famine, and warfare are raging like the fierce north wind. The Buddha’s teaching has waned in strength. . . . The jewel-like teaching of insight is fading day by day.1 I am a credulous and helpless animal Who has been fooled by the mirage of duality. ... So now you, my father are my only refuge; You alone can grasp the buddha state. The glorious copper-colored mountain is within my heart. Is not this pure and all-pervading naked mind your dwelling place? Although I live in the slime and muck of the dark age, I still aspire to see it. Although I stumble in the thick, black fog of materialism, I still aspire to see it.2 It is most common nowadays in public political discourse to speak of the United States as a global object of desire. “Everyone” wants to come to the United States, to become American, or to wield the military influence that has been the sole purview of the United States in the post–Cold War era, we http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

"We Drank Many Gin and Tonics": Desire and Enchantment in Merton's Buddhist Pilgrimage

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 37 – Oct 28, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

“We Drank Many Gin and Tonics”: Desire and Enchantment in Merton’s Buddhist Pilgrimage Jack Downey La Salle University This is the darkest hour of the dark ages. Disease, famine, and warfare are raging like the fierce north wind. The Buddha’s teaching has waned in strength. . . . The jewel-like teaching of insight is fading day by day.1 I am a credulous and helpless animal Who has been fooled by the mirage of duality. ... So now you, my father are my only refuge; You alone can grasp the buddha state. The glorious copper-colored mountain is within my heart. Is not this pure and all-pervading naked mind your dwelling place? Although I live in the slime and muck of the dark age, I still aspire to see it. Although I stumble in the thick, black fog of materialism, I still aspire to see it.2 It is most common nowadays in public political discourse to speak of the United States as a global object of desire. “Everyone” wants to come to the United States, to become American, or to wield the military influence that has been the sole purview of the United States in the post–Cold War era, we

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 28, 2017

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