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Water Architecture in South Asia: A Study of Types, Development and Meanings (review)

Water Architecture in South Asia: A Study of Types, Development and Meanings (review) book reviews quarter of the first millennium'' ( p. 33), however, previously they discussed the infant burial jars from the ``ancient period'' of Ban Chiang and fail to mention the extensive use of infant jar burials at the Bronze Age site of Ban Lum Khao (C. F. W. Higham, Early Cultures of Mainland Southeast Asia [Bangkok: River Books, 2002]). Grave furniture is first described in an interesting overview chapter of the funerary deposits and their significance and then descriptions are detailed in a later chapter. Suggestions are made regarding the status of individuals and the presence and type of jewelry with the human remains. Necklaces of glass, stone, and shell beads are predominantly found in infant and child burials; bronze with adults. Much detail is provided in particular for the analysis of the stone beads, predominantly carnelian and agate, including measurements, analysis of composition, and suggestions of possible origin and site of manufacture. It is suggested that the beads were manufactured within Southeast Asia, rather than India. Iron artifacts were an important inclusion in many graves. Iron knives and agricultural tools are described, and some attempts to infer their function based on their similarity to modern artifacts are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Water Architecture in South Asia: A Study of Types, Development and Meanings (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 44 (2) – Nov 21, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
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Abstract

book reviews quarter of the first millennium'' ( p. 33), however, previously they discussed the infant burial jars from the ``ancient period'' of Ban Chiang and fail to mention the extensive use of infant jar burials at the Bronze Age site of Ban Lum Khao (C. F. W. Higham, Early Cultures of Mainland Southeast Asia [Bangkok: River Books, 2002]). Grave furniture is first described in an interesting overview chapter of the funerary deposits and their significance and then descriptions are detailed in a later chapter. Suggestions are made regarding the status of individuals and the presence and type of jewelry with the human remains. Necklaces of glass, stone, and shell beads are predominantly found in infant and child burials; bronze with adults. Much detail is provided in particular for the analysis of the stone beads, predominantly carnelian and agate, including measurements, analysis of composition, and suggestions of possible origin and site of manufacture. It is suggested that the beads were manufactured within Southeast Asia, rather than India. Iron artifacts were an important inclusion in many graves. Iron knives and agricultural tools are described, and some attempts to infer their function based on their similarity to modern artifacts are

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 21, 2005

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