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“Vowel Length in Niuean” and Déjà Vu

“Vowel Length in Niuean” and Déjà Vu Notes and Queries "Vowel Length in Niuean" and Déjà Vu Albert J. Schütz UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I Even though Niuean and Tongan, although closely related, are considered to be separate languages, when I read "Vowel Length in Niuean" (Rolle and Starks 2014) in the previous issue of this journal, it was clear that the authors' treatment of the main topic of the article-- the patterning of long vowels vs. double vowels--could easily have been applied to the same phenomenon in Tongan. I described this feature and others related to Tongan accent in Schütz 2001 (which is included in the references section of the authors' article). Apparently the authors missed this section (2001:319­21), even though the heading, in boldfaced capital letters, is: "What accounts for the `double vowel' and the varying accent patterns of diphthongs in certain positions?" After noting that C. Maxwell Churchward (1953, unexpectedly missing from the references) recommended writing both double vowels and long vowels, even though there was no phonemic contrast, I proposed (2001:319): Based on the taped data for this study ... it seems that a penultimate long vowel in a word said in citation form or at the peak of the phonological phrase (the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

“Vowel Length in Niuean” and Déjà Vu

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 54 (1) – Jul 21, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Notes and Queries "Vowel Length in Niuean" and Déjà Vu Albert J. Schütz UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I Even though Niuean and Tongan, although closely related, are considered to be separate languages, when I read "Vowel Length in Niuean" (Rolle and Starks 2014) in the previous issue of this journal, it was clear that the authors' treatment of the main topic of the article-- the patterning of long vowels vs. double vowels--could easily have been applied to the same phenomenon in Tongan. I described this feature and others related to Tongan accent in Schütz 2001 (which is included in the references section of the authors' article). Apparently the authors missed this section (2001:319­21), even though the heading, in boldfaced capital letters, is: "What accounts for the `double vowel' and the varying accent patterns of diphthongs in certain positions?" After noting that C. Maxwell Churchward (1953, unexpectedly missing from the references) recommended writing both double vowels and long vowels, even though there was no phonemic contrast, I proposed (2001:319): Based on the taped data for this study ... it seems that a penultimate long vowel in a word said in citation form or at the peak of the phonological phrase (the

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 21, 2015

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