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Voter Education: Provincial Autonomy and the Transformation of Chinese Election Law, 1920–1923

Voter Education: Provincial Autonomy and the Transformation of Chinese Election Law, 1920–1923 Abstract: Beginning in 1909, mainland Chinese governments routinely held elections and lawmakers devoted considerable resources to writing and revising election laws. The earliest elections, held during the late Qing and the early Republic, utilized laws based on restricted electorates and indirect voting. By contrast, election laws designed by the provincial autonomy movements of the 1920s and the post-1927 Nationalist government featured direct voting in elections with (near-)universal adult suffrage. Each of these two systems of electoral law incorporated elements of foreign electoral practice with concerns and ideas that arose from the experiences and ideals of late imperial Chinese political thought. The transition between these two systems highlights the surprising influence of the short-lived provincial autonomy movement on the legal structures of the centralized one-party states that followed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

Voter Education: Provincial Autonomy and the Transformation of Chinese Election Law, 1920–1923

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9674
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Beginning in 1909, mainland Chinese governments routinely held elections and lawmakers devoted considerable resources to writing and revising election laws. The earliest elections, held during the late Qing and the early Republic, utilized laws based on restricted electorates and indirect voting. By contrast, election laws designed by the provincial autonomy movements of the 1920s and the post-1927 Nationalist government featured direct voting in elections with (near-)universal adult suffrage. Each of these two systems of electoral law incorporated elements of foreign electoral practice with concerns and ideas that arose from the experiences and ideals of late imperial Chinese political thought. The transition between these two systems highlights the surprising influence of the short-lived provincial autonomy movement on the legal structures of the centralized one-party states that followed.

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 31, 2013

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