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Vasco da Gama and Africa: An Era of Mutual Discovery, 1497-1800

Vasco da Gama and Africa: An Era of Mutual Discovery, 1497-1800 On the quincentennial of Vasco da Gama's successful voyage around Africa to India, this article explores the economic and cultural importance for Africans of new contacts with Europe. The exploration of mutual interests, characteristic of da Gama's voyage, generally continued on the once isolated Atlantic side of the continent, where African elites sought imported goods, even as their exports consisted more and more of slaves; acquired facility in European languages; and experimented with Christianity and Western education. On the Indian Ocean side there were few long-term changes, despite early Portuguese attacks on the already prosperous, Muslim-ruled city-states of the Swahili coast. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Vasco da Gama and Africa: An Era of Mutual Discovery, 1497-1800

Journal of World History , Volume 9 (2) – Feb 24, 1998

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

On the quincentennial of Vasco da Gama's successful voyage around Africa to India, this article explores the economic and cultural importance for Africans of new contacts with Europe. The exploration of mutual interests, characteristic of da Gama's voyage, generally continued on the once isolated Atlantic side of the continent, where African elites sought imported goods, even as their exports consisted more and more of slaves; acquired facility in European languages; and experimented with Christianity and Western education. On the Indian Ocean side there were few long-term changes, despite early Portuguese attacks on the already prosperous, Muslim-ruled city-states of the Swahili coast.

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 24, 1998

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