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Varua Tupu: New Writing from French Polynesia (review)

Varua Tupu: New Writing from French Polynesia (review) the contemporary pacific · 20:2 (2008) After the welcome by the Hawaiian delegation, we were shown a slide show detailing the life of Hawaiian artist Bobby Holcomb who had lived in Huahine, Tahiti, until his untimely death. His sumptuous artwork adorns the journal cover, which depicts a side close-up of an intricately tattooed man blowing on a shell to coax out a little crab. Like the carapace, the tattoo adorns the man in a divinely protective and identifying series of patterns, and the outstretched feelers and eyes of the crab in its shell reach out toward the breath that fills its shell cradled and cauled in the man's palm. This counterbalancing between natural, human, and divine elements is a feature of other work by Holcomb, such as the detail from "Ruahatu, God of the Ocean," where the god carries a stone marae or sacred temple to Huahine. The two moving and entertaining accounts of Holcomb's work and life reveal his close association with Salvador Dali. Other Holcomb images reveal a mixture of mythological and realist elements that have the daring flavor of surrealism. The photographic essay by Michel Chansin of Fa`a`a, the largest town in Tahiti, provides the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Varua Tupu: New Writing from French Polynesia (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 20 (2) – Aug 1, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai’i Press
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 20:2 (2008) After the welcome by the Hawaiian delegation, we were shown a slide show detailing the life of Hawaiian artist Bobby Holcomb who had lived in Huahine, Tahiti, until his untimely death. His sumptuous artwork adorns the journal cover, which depicts a side close-up of an intricately tattooed man blowing on a shell to coax out a little crab. Like the carapace, the tattoo adorns the man in a divinely protective and identifying series of patterns, and the outstretched feelers and eyes of the crab in its shell reach out toward the breath that fills its shell cradled and cauled in the man's palm. This counterbalancing between natural, human, and divine elements is a feature of other work by Holcomb, such as the detail from "Ruahatu, God of the Ocean," where the god carries a stone marae or sacred temple to Huahine. The two moving and entertaining accounts of Holcomb's work and life reveal his close association with Salvador Dali. Other Holcomb images reveal a mixture of mythological and realist elements that have the daring flavor of surrealism. The photographic essay by Michel Chansin of Fa`a`a, the largest town in Tahiti, provides the

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 1, 2008

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