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Using The Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola as a Basis for a Buddhist-Christian Retreat

Using The Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola as a Basis for a Buddhist-Christian Retreat Len Tischler University of Scranton Andre Delbecq Santa Clara University origin of the retreat Jesuit (Catholic) universities have struggled to preserve their religious worldview and pass it on to their students, faculty, and staff. Given that most faculty and administrators at these universities are laypeople and many are not Catholic, the universities depend largely on their campus mission/ministry offices for this purpose. One of the primary methods of sharing their worldview has been to provide retreats for students. The retreats are introspective with a religious and Jesuit orientation. Most student retreats are conducted over a weekend; some over a full week. Most Jesuit universities get fewer than ten percent of their students to attend one retreat in their four years on campus. Far fewer students attend more than one retreat. These schools also attempt to encourage faculty and staff to attend similar retreats, and participation in these retreats is similarly modest. Retreats have been a primary tool for the formation of Jesuit priests. Their formation program includes taking at least two retreats of twenty-eight to thirty days each. These retreats use the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, a specific pattern of reflective meditation and introspection over twenty-eight http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Using The Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola as a Basis for a Buddhist-Christian Retreat

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Dec 16, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

Len Tischler University of Scranton Andre Delbecq Santa Clara University origin of the retreat Jesuit (Catholic) universities have struggled to preserve their religious worldview and pass it on to their students, faculty, and staff. Given that most faculty and administrators at these universities are laypeople and many are not Catholic, the universities depend largely on their campus mission/ministry offices for this purpose. One of the primary methods of sharing their worldview has been to provide retreats for students. The retreats are introspective with a religious and Jesuit orientation. Most student retreats are conducted over a weekend; some over a full week. Most Jesuit universities get fewer than ten percent of their students to attend one retreat in their four years on campus. Far fewer students attend more than one retreat. These schools also attempt to encourage faculty and staff to attend similar retreats, and participation in these retreats is similarly modest. Retreats have been a primary tool for the formation of Jesuit priests. Their formation program includes taking at least two retreats of twenty-eight to thirty days each. These retreats use the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, a specific pattern of reflective meditation and introspection over twenty-eight

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 16, 2015

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