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Urbanization in Early and Medieval China: Gazetteers for the City of Suzhou trans. by Olivia Milburn (review)

Urbanization in Early and Medieval China: Gazetteers for the City of Suzhou trans. by Olivia... Reviews Olivia Milburn, translator and author. Urbanization in Early and Medieval China: Gazetteers for the City of Suzhou. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2015. xx, 400 pp., 17 maps, 10 tables. Hardcover $50.00, isbn 978-0295-99460-4. Suzhou is a city particularly good to "think with" for historians at large. Except for its inception as the capital of the ancient kingdom of Wu centuries before China's first unification, Suzhou has been a non-capital city throughout the imperial era, remaining at some distance from the seat of empires and the portals of power; this distance distinguishes Suzhou from the more politically prominent yet far more frangible imperial capitals, such as Kaifeng, Luoyang, and Chang'an, and makes it an extremely valuable case study. Given Suzhou's 2,500-year history and the continuity of information available, it has been the second half of this history that has received the most sustained attention from scholars. This is not surprising; after all, records from the late imperial era constitute the most abundant of our available evidence regarding how Suzhou was built, maintained, governed, and perceived. In his essay "A Millennium of Chinese Urban History," F. W. Mote holds up Suzhou as an example of a Chinese city http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Urbanization in Early and Medieval China: Gazetteers for the City of Suzhou trans. by Olivia Milburn (review)

China Review International , Volume 21 (2) – Nov 28, 2014

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews Olivia Milburn, translator and author. Urbanization in Early and Medieval China: Gazetteers for the City of Suzhou. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2015. xx, 400 pp., 17 maps, 10 tables. Hardcover $50.00, isbn 978-0295-99460-4. Suzhou is a city particularly good to "think with" for historians at large. Except for its inception as the capital of the ancient kingdom of Wu centuries before China's first unification, Suzhou has been a non-capital city throughout the imperial era, remaining at some distance from the seat of empires and the portals of power; this distance distinguishes Suzhou from the more politically prominent yet far more frangible imperial capitals, such as Kaifeng, Luoyang, and Chang'an, and makes it an extremely valuable case study. Given Suzhou's 2,500-year history and the continuity of information available, it has been the second half of this history that has received the most sustained attention from scholars. This is not surprising; after all, records from the late imperial era constitute the most abundant of our available evidence regarding how Suzhou was built, maintained, governed, and perceived. In his essay "A Millennium of Chinese Urban History," F. W. Mote holds up Suzhou as an example of a Chinese city

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 28, 2014

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