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Urban Communities, State, Spatial Order, and Modernity: Studies of Imperial and Republican Beijing in Perspective

Urban Communities, State, Spatial Order, and Modernity: Studies of Imperial and Republican... Features Madeleine Yue Dong. Republican Beijing: The City and Its Histories. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. xxiii, 380 pp. Cloth $50.00/£32.50, ISBN 0-520-23050-7. Susan Naquin. Peking: Temples and City Life, 1400­1900. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000. xxxv, 816 pp. Cloth $85.00/£55.00, ISBN 0-520-21991-0. Jianfei Zhu. Chinese Spatial Strategies: Imperial Beijing, 1420­1911. London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2004. xiv, 281 pp. Hardback $135.00, ISBN 0-415-31883-1. A Historiographic Context During the 1970s, new studies on urban China began to advance rapidly while scholars decisively abandoned Max Weber's propositions about Chinese cities1 that had dominated the field. The first such systematic challenge to the Weberian approach, it is recalled, was led by G. William Skinner whose path-breaking studies2 were built on his earlier research work on the marketing and social structure in rural China. Skinner refutes several basic Weberian assumptions about Chinese cities. One is that traditional Chinese cities were built neither on nor for trade but mainly served as residences of imperial viceroys.3 By re-presenting the medieval (the eighth through the thirteenth century) economic and urban revolution "discovered" by Denis Twitchett, Shiba Yoshinobu, Mark Elvin, and others4 in a new framework of "regional citification and urban systems" and by further extending http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Urban Communities, State, Spatial Order, and Modernity: Studies of Imperial and Republican Beijing in Perspective

China Review International , Volume 15 (1) – Apr 1, 2008

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Abstract

Features Madeleine Yue Dong. Republican Beijing: The City and Its Histories. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. xxiii, 380 pp. Cloth $50.00/£32.50, ISBN 0-520-23050-7. Susan Naquin. Peking: Temples and City Life, 1400­1900. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000. xxxv, 816 pp. Cloth $85.00/£55.00, ISBN 0-520-21991-0. Jianfei Zhu. Chinese Spatial Strategies: Imperial Beijing, 1420­1911. London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2004. xiv, 281 pp. Hardback $135.00, ISBN 0-415-31883-1. A Historiographic Context During the 1970s, new studies on urban China began to advance rapidly while scholars decisively abandoned Max Weber's propositions about Chinese cities1 that had dominated the field. The first such systematic challenge to the Weberian approach, it is recalled, was led by G. William Skinner whose path-breaking studies2 were built on his earlier research work on the marketing and social structure in rural China. Skinner refutes several basic Weberian assumptions about Chinese cities. One is that traditional Chinese cities were built neither on nor for trade but mainly served as residences of imperial viceroys.3 By re-presenting the medieval (the eighth through the thirteenth century) economic and urban revolution "discovered" by Denis Twitchett, Shiba Yoshinobu, Mark Elvin, and others4 in a new framework of "regional citification and urban systems" and by further extending

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 1, 2008

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