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Under Heaven's Brow: Pre-Christian Religious Tradition in Chuuk (review)

Under Heaven's Brow: Pre-Christian Religious Tradition in Chuuk (review) book and media reviews 491 community in Chuuk State, Marshall representing different time periods to has succeeded brilliantly, in my opin- arrive at conclusions about how far ion. First he provides us with an they have changed in their lifestyles appropriate social and historical and attitudes. He often compares his context for Namoluk and then brings present data with that of 1969, when us to the modern era by tracing the he first started work on Namoluk. He effects of colonial policy on island identifies specific social changes, not migration. First there was work in just population movements, but also the phosphate mines— hard work but aspects of material culture, diet, and probably remunerative for the people human relationships, among others. concerned. Then, the desire for educa- Marshall’s in-depth study of indi- tion led the Namoluk people to send vidual character and personality, as their children to colonial and mission illustrated in anecdotal evidence, con- schools in other islands. More such tributes significantly to the effective- migration took place under the US ness of his research. This particular administration, after World War II aspect of the study complements its and especially during the Kennedy more general aspects because it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Under Heaven's Brow: Pre-Christian Religious Tradition in Chuuk (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 17 (2) – Jul 29, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

book and media reviews 491 community in Chuuk State, Marshall representing different time periods to has succeeded brilliantly, in my opin- arrive at conclusions about how far ion. First he provides us with an they have changed in their lifestyles appropriate social and historical and attitudes. He often compares his context for Namoluk and then brings present data with that of 1969, when us to the modern era by tracing the he first started work on Namoluk. He effects of colonial policy on island identifies specific social changes, not migration. First there was work in just population movements, but also the phosphate mines— hard work but aspects of material culture, diet, and probably remunerative for the people human relationships, among others. concerned. Then, the desire for educa- Marshall’s in-depth study of indi- tion led the Namoluk people to send vidual character and personality, as their children to colonial and mission illustrated in anecdotal evidence, con- schools in other islands. More such tributes significantly to the effective- migration took place under the US ness of his research. This particular administration, after World War II aspect of the study complements its and especially during the Kennedy more general aspects because it

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 29, 2005

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