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Trial of Modernity: Judicial Reform in Early Twentieth Century China, 1901–1937 by Xu Xiaoqun (review)

Trial of Modernity: Judicial Reform in Early Twentieth Century China, 1901–1937 by Xu Xiaoqun... 416 China Review International: Vol. 18, No. 3, 2011 programs went into effect in 2006–2007, most farmers today have considerably less to complain about and more to applaud vis-à-vis the state. Overall, the book is a good read. In drawing from the findings of a large number of researchers, Wright generally comes to judicious conclusions. The book is well paced, informative, and jargon-free, and for all these reasons it would be a good selection for university courses on contemporary China. Jonathan Unger Jonathan Unger, a sociologist, is a professor in the Political and Social Change Department at the Australian National University. He has published on all of the groups discussed in this review. Xu Xiaoqun. Trial of Modernity: Judicial Reform in Early Twentieth Century China, 1901–1937. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2008. x, 378 pp. Hardcover $65.00, isbn 978-0-8046-5586-3. In his new book, Xu Xiaoqun presents a valuable and carefully researched portrait of the development of legal institutions in twentieth-century China, narrow enough in its gauge to be genuinely interesting and broad enough in its implica- tions to contribute to a more complex understanding of the state in Chinese history. Each chapter of the carefully written study has insights http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Trial of Modernity: Judicial Reform in Early Twentieth Century China, 1901–1937 by Xu Xiaoqun (review)

China Review International , Volume 18 (3) – Oct 1, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

416 China Review International: Vol. 18, No. 3, 2011 programs went into effect in 2006–2007, most farmers today have considerably less to complain about and more to applaud vis-à-vis the state. Overall, the book is a good read. In drawing from the findings of a large number of researchers, Wright generally comes to judicious conclusions. The book is well paced, informative, and jargon-free, and for all these reasons it would be a good selection for university courses on contemporary China. Jonathan Unger Jonathan Unger, a sociologist, is a professor in the Political and Social Change Department at the Australian National University. He has published on all of the groups discussed in this review. Xu Xiaoqun. Trial of Modernity: Judicial Reform in Early Twentieth Century China, 1901–1937. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2008. x, 378 pp. Hardcover $65.00, isbn 978-0-8046-5586-3. In his new book, Xu Xiaoqun presents a valuable and carefully researched portrait of the development of legal institutions in twentieth-century China, narrow enough in its gauge to be genuinely interesting and broad enough in its implica- tions to contribute to a more complex understanding of the state in Chinese history. Each chapter of the carefully written study has insights

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2013

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