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Transcendence and Violence: The Encounter of Buddhist, Christian, and Primal Traditions (review)

Transcendence and Violence: The Encounter of Buddhist, Christian, and Primal Traditions (review) BOOK REVIEWS In "Here and There," Claudel goes to Shizuoka, to the Rinzaiji Temple. "Time is measured there among the leaves, in front of the golden Buddha, by the burning of a small candle, and, in the depths of this ravine, by the flow of a triple fountain." He seems moved, under the spell of the place and its symbols, but then veers into a philosophical untangling of "a principle of existence . . . and its precarious expression." As he observes worshipers before three thousand golden Kannons that he refers to as "divine rubbish," he complains that "their blinded eyes refused to recognize unconditional being," by which he seems to mean something total yet encompassing an awareness of their own particular presence. This confusion between the seamless whole of "unconditional being" and its distinctive parts is the point at which Buddha, Claudel suggests, developed and perfected the "pagan blasphemy" of Nothingness. He seems to equate the Buddhist concept of Nothingness with "garrulous delirium" and the desire for detachment with "the ultimate Satanic mystery, the silence of the creature retrenched in a total refusal, the incestuous quietude of the soul seated on its own essential difference." Here and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Transcendence and Violence: The Encounter of Buddhist, Christian, and Primal Traditions (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS In "Here and There," Claudel goes to Shizuoka, to the Rinzaiji Temple. "Time is measured there among the leaves, in front of the golden Buddha, by the burning of a small candle, and, in the depths of this ravine, by the flow of a triple fountain." He seems moved, under the spell of the place and its symbols, but then veers into a philosophical untangling of "a principle of existence . . . and its precarious expression." As he observes worshipers before three thousand golden Kannons that he refers to as "divine rubbish," he complains that "their blinded eyes refused to recognize unconditional being," by which he seems to mean something total yet encompassing an awareness of their own particular presence. This confusion between the seamless whole of "unconditional being" and its distinctive parts is the point at which Buddha, Claudel suggests, developed and perfected the "pagan blasphemy" of Nothingness. He seems to equate the Buddhist concept of Nothingness with "garrulous delirium" and the desire for detachment with "the ultimate Satanic mystery, the silence of the creature retrenched in a total refusal, the incestuous quietude of the soul seated on its own essential difference." Here and

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

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