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Trading Nature: Tahitians, Europeans, and Ecological Exchange by Jennifer Newell (review)

Trading Nature: Tahitians, Europeans, and Ecological Exchange by Jennifer Newell (review) book and media reviews that avoids getting too caught up in the byzantine mazes that local-level Melanesian politics are so famous for. It will well serve the high school or college classroom as well as any other context in which climate change and environmental issues are raised. human experience. Trading Nature seeks to illustrate and resolve the many inadequacies that this tendency has yielded in broadly circulating understandings of Tahitian historical encounters. Numerous facts about various sorts of exchange are used to showcase the ways in which nature and culture are historically intertwined, as well as the ways in which influences exerted on one another are catalyzed by the interactions of cultural groupings with divergent interests, resulting in consequential legacies into the present. As Newell both argues and reveals throughout the text, the culturally encoded "naturalness" of a place plays a direct role in how an environment is conceived, interpreted, and interacted with. Trading Nature also identifies the significance of fluidity--the ways in which the meanings ascribed to and the values associated with the components of a natural environment ceaselessly fluctuate over time. Indeed, in many places, Newell's text contributes to the broad conversation in Pacific history about http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Trading Nature: Tahitians, Europeans, and Ecological Exchange by Jennifer Newell (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 25 (1) – Mar 27, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews that avoids getting too caught up in the byzantine mazes that local-level Melanesian politics are so famous for. It will well serve the high school or college classroom as well as any other context in which climate change and environmental issues are raised. human experience. Trading Nature seeks to illustrate and resolve the many inadequacies that this tendency has yielded in broadly circulating understandings of Tahitian historical encounters. Numerous facts about various sorts of exchange are used to showcase the ways in which nature and culture are historically intertwined, as well as the ways in which influences exerted on one another are catalyzed by the interactions of cultural groupings with divergent interests, resulting in consequential legacies into the present. As Newell both argues and reveals throughout the text, the culturally encoded "naturalness" of a place plays a direct role in how an environment is conceived, interpreted, and interacted with. Trading Nature also identifies the significance of fluidity--the ways in which the meanings ascribed to and the values associated with the components of a natural environment ceaselessly fluctuate over time. Indeed, in many places, Newell's text contributes to the broad conversation in Pacific history about

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 27, 2013

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