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Toward Normalizing U.S.-Korea Relations: In Due Course? (review)

Toward Normalizing U.S.-Korea Relations: In Due Course? (review) korean studies, vol. 26, no. 2 The individual experiences over three years and ranging in space from Pusan to the Yalu add up to a comprehensive and recognizable mosaic. The weapons, communications wire, flares, battlefield noise, barbed wire, raids, ambushes, assaults, defense, rest and recuperation, extremes of temperature, dysentery, trenches, outposts, and listening posts affect the reader who shares the foxhole view with narrators recalling how it was fifty years ago. Description of the grimness of close combat and the almost tactile appreciation of the austere and menacing battlefield have been done before in several forms: novels like All Quiet On the Western Front, diaries like Rommel's Attacks!, memoirs like George McDonald Frasier's Quartered Safe Out Here or Field-Marshal Viscount Slim's Defeat Into Victory, histories like Keith William Nolan's Ripcord, journalists' accounts like Blackhawk Down, and more. Do we need another individual soldier account of soldiers in combat? Your reviewer, who carried a Browning Automatic Rifle as an enlisted combat infantryman in the war, answers in the affirmative. The Korean War veterans will die out before long. The lads of that war are in their seventies, their leaders in their eighties and nineties. Historians cannot have too many http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Toward Normalizing U.S.-Korea Relations: In Due Course? (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 26 (2) – Dec 3, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
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Abstract

korean studies, vol. 26, no. 2 The individual experiences over three years and ranging in space from Pusan to the Yalu add up to a comprehensive and recognizable mosaic. The weapons, communications wire, flares, battlefield noise, barbed wire, raids, ambushes, assaults, defense, rest and recuperation, extremes of temperature, dysentery, trenches, outposts, and listening posts affect the reader who shares the foxhole view with narrators recalling how it was fifty years ago. Description of the grimness of close combat and the almost tactile appreciation of the austere and menacing battlefield have been done before in several forms: novels like All Quiet On the Western Front, diaries like Rommel's Attacks!, memoirs like George McDonald Frasier's Quartered Safe Out Here or Field-Marshal Viscount Slim's Defeat Into Victory, histories like Keith William Nolan's Ripcord, journalists' accounts like Blackhawk Down, and more. Do we need another individual soldier account of soldiers in combat? Your reviewer, who carried a Browning Automatic Rifle as an enlisted combat infantryman in the war, answers in the affirmative. The Korean War veterans will die out before long. The lads of that war are in their seventies, their leaders in their eighties and nineties. Historians cannot have too many

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 3, 2002

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