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Tongan Accent

Tongan Accent Tongan Accent1 Albert J. Schütz university of hawai`i This paper examines previous accounts of Tongan accent--especially those that have attempted to predict accent placement by using either syllable count or morpheme boundaries. Both means are shown to be inadequate. An alternative is suggested--that of positing the measure as a unit of accent, a prosodic unit between the syllable and the phonological phrase. 1. INTRODUCTION. C. Maxwell Churchward (CMC), an astute observer of several Oceanic languages and a proli²c writer of grammars and dictionaries, had an unusual method of organizing his grammars. For example, he began his description of Rotuman (1940) with a "general survey," then moved to sounds and in³ections in detail, and ²nally treated "supplementary details." For Fijian (1941), he re²ned the system to just two parts: "general survey" and "additional details," and for Tongan (1953), he approached the problem of an overall verb classi²cation by dividing the topic into a chapter on "verbs, subjects, and objects," "more about verbs," and "still more about verbs." Therefore, it comes as no surprise to ²nd that in his Tongan grammar he divided the topic of accent into "the fundamental facts" and "some irregularities."2 In this paper, I shall try http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

Tongan Accent1 Albert J. Schütz university of hawai`i This paper examines previous accounts of Tongan accent--especially those that have attempted to predict accent placement by using either syllable count or morpheme boundaries. Both means are shown to be inadequate. An alternative is suggested--that of positing the measure as a unit of accent, a prosodic unit between the syllable and the phonological phrase. 1. INTRODUCTION. C. Maxwell Churchward (CMC), an astute observer of several Oceanic languages and a proli²c writer of grammars and dictionaries, had an unusual method of organizing his grammars. For example, he began his description of Rotuman (1940) with a "general survey," then moved to sounds and in³ections in detail, and ²nally treated "supplementary details." For Fijian (1941), he re²ned the system to just two parts: "general survey" and "additional details," and for Tongan (1953), he approached the problem of an overall verb classi²cation by dividing the topic into a chapter on "verbs, subjects, and objects," "more about verbs," and "still more about verbs." Therefore, it comes as no surprise to ²nd that in his Tongan grammar he divided the topic of accent into "the fundamental facts" and "some irregularities."2 In this paper, I shall try

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 12, 2001

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