Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Tibet through Dissident Chinese Eyes: Essays on Self-Determination (review)

Tibet through Dissident Chinese Eyes: Essays on Self-Determination (review) Cao Changching and James D. Seymour, editors. Tibet through Dissident Chinese Eyes: Essays on Self-Determination. Armonk and London: M. E. Sharpe, 1998. xxviii, 133 pp. Hardcover $48.95, ISBN 1­56324­922­7. Tibet, for reasons both ethical and romantic, arouses strong emotions in the West. The notion of a deeply spiritual and unique culture being destroyed by a neighboring state in the name of nationalism and progress is profoundly disturbing to large numbers of people in the outside world. At the same time, Tibet arouses equally strong emotions in the People's Republic of China: the Beijing government teaches that Tibet is, and has long been, a part of China, but was stolen from the ancestral land by predatory imperialists. Having finally been restored due to the diligence of the Communist Party, Tibetans must now become one with the other nationalities of the country. This fascinating book attempts to come to grips with the Tibet issue from a different point of view. Coeditor Seymour points out in his introduction that, although the Chinese learned about imperialism the hard way--by being its victims--many of the lessons they learned were the wrong ones. While much of the rest of the world has abandoned hegemonistic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Tibet through Dissident Chinese Eyes: Essays on Self-Determination (review)

China Review International , Volume 6 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/tibet-through-dissident-chinese-eyes-essays-on-self-determination-fxPHb4s2VR
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright by University of Hawaii Press
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cao Changching and James D. Seymour, editors. Tibet through Dissident Chinese Eyes: Essays on Self-Determination. Armonk and London: M. E. Sharpe, 1998. xxviii, 133 pp. Hardcover $48.95, ISBN 1­56324­922­7. Tibet, for reasons both ethical and romantic, arouses strong emotions in the West. The notion of a deeply spiritual and unique culture being destroyed by a neighboring state in the name of nationalism and progress is profoundly disturbing to large numbers of people in the outside world. At the same time, Tibet arouses equally strong emotions in the People's Republic of China: the Beijing government teaches that Tibet is, and has long been, a part of China, but was stolen from the ancestral land by predatory imperialists. Having finally been restored due to the diligence of the Communist Party, Tibetans must now become one with the other nationalities of the country. This fascinating book attempts to come to grips with the Tibet issue from a different point of view. Coeditor Seymour points out in his introduction that, although the Chinese learned about imperialism the hard way--by being its victims--many of the lessons they learned were the wrong ones. While much of the rest of the world has abandoned hegemonistic

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.