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Thucydides on Strategy: Grand Strategies in the Peloponnesian War and Their Relevance Today (review)

Thucydides on Strategy: Grand Strategies in the Peloponnesian War and Their Relevance Today (review) Book Reviews 155 “allies” to contribute a head of cattle per city. But still private donation and public purchase (perhaps from Boeotia, “Cattle Land,” as the name translates) were required to fill Athens’s sacrificial needs (p. 177ff.). Indeed, the demand created by the sacred economy may have even led to the commercialization of the meat supply in Attica (p. 195). The historian will find all this information very useful, and it certainly helps shed light on certain episodes in Greek history, like the Megar- ian Decrees (only barely mentioned by McInerney on p. 150 but now begging to be reinterpreted) and the struggle over the Krisaean Plain at Delphi in the (so-called) First Sacred War (pp. 150–153). McInerney closes with a final “body” chapter (chapter 10) on the role of cattle and sacrifice-related activities in the development of a monetary economy for the Greeks (e.g., the Greek monetary denomi- nation of the “obel” was originally a spit of iron used to roast meat; images of cows on coins harken back to a time when ownership of cat- tle was proof of wealth, etc.). A concluding chapter summarizes McIn- erney’s arguments, pushing for recognition of the pervasive influence of cattle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Thucydides on Strategy: Grand Strategies in the Peloponnesian War and Their Relevance Today (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (1) – Jun 15, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

Book Reviews 155 “allies” to contribute a head of cattle per city. But still private donation and public purchase (perhaps from Boeotia, “Cattle Land,” as the name translates) were required to fill Athens’s sacrificial needs (p. 177ff.). Indeed, the demand created by the sacred economy may have even led to the commercialization of the meat supply in Attica (p. 195). The historian will find all this information very useful, and it certainly helps shed light on certain episodes in Greek history, like the Megar- ian Decrees (only barely mentioned by McInerney on p. 150 but now begging to be reinterpreted) and the struggle over the Krisaean Plain at Delphi in the (so-called) First Sacred War (pp. 150–153). McInerney closes with a final “body” chapter (chapter 10) on the role of cattle and sacrifice-related activities in the development of a monetary economy for the Greeks (e.g., the Greek monetary denomi- nation of the “obel” was originally a spit of iron used to roast meat; images of cows on coins harken back to a time when ownership of cat- tle was proof of wealth, etc.). A concluding chapter summarizes McIn- erney’s arguments, pushing for recognition of the pervasive influence of cattle

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 15, 2012

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