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Three Poems

Three Poems WALIS NOKAN duckweed “More and more like the floating duckweed…” Someone returned to the tribe this evening Amid bamboo fences scattered over the mountain Pondering the pains and regrets of history Too much rice wine to drink Makes for incoherent babbling Mizunuo, you’ve lived a pretty good life What makes you suffer so? Your hut was completed before winter The peach trees blossomed in the saddle of the mountain In the second month Someone married a girl from a different village Everyone is overjoyed So what is it that worries you so? “Three hundred years ago our ancestors wove fishnets and caught fish Large sailing ships from the West appeared blocking out the sun Fifty years later they shunned the farmed plains Returning to the forests to hunt Aside from fighting over the land We lived in peace with each other When the Japanese came, what was termed ‘civilizing the savages’ Was in fact flogging, from the coast to the mountains We’ve been like duckweed the last century…” Someone returned to the tribe this evening Rubbing the wound of history getting drunk No one doubted his suffering Perhaps he was mourning for his far-flung relatives 136 Perhaps he was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Three Poems

Manoa , Volume 15 (1) – May 19, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

WALIS NOKAN duckweed “More and more like the floating duckweed…” Someone returned to the tribe this evening Amid bamboo fences scattered over the mountain Pondering the pains and regrets of history Too much rice wine to drink Makes for incoherent babbling Mizunuo, you’ve lived a pretty good life What makes you suffer so? Your hut was completed before winter The peach trees blossomed in the saddle of the mountain In the second month Someone married a girl from a different village Everyone is overjoyed So what is it that worries you so? “Three hundred years ago our ancestors wove fishnets and caught fish Large sailing ships from the West appeared blocking out the sun Fifty years later they shunned the farmed plains Returning to the forests to hunt Aside from fighting over the land We lived in peace with each other When the Japanese came, what was termed ‘civilizing the savages’ Was in fact flogging, from the coast to the mountains We’ve been like duckweed the last century…” Someone returned to the tribe this evening Rubbing the wound of history getting drunk No one doubted his suffering Perhaps he was mourning for his far-flung relatives 136 Perhaps he was

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 19, 2003

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