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Theatre of Roots: Redirecting the Modern Indian Stage (review)

Theatre of Roots: Redirecting the Modern Indian Stage (review) ple, while discussing Lin's 1904 translation of Tales from Shakespeare, he notes that "Lin was not assimilating Shakespeare in order to introduce new expressive modes in the emerging modern Chinese theatre" (p. 85). When discussing two reformed jingju plays in 1904 and 1906, he argues that "while the nascent Western-style spoken drama was limited to the elite urbanites, xiqu was a popular form of entertainment with a much larger audience and was often used for propagandist purposes" (p. 59). These two statements compare cultural practices to the huaju they predated. In his discussion of Jiao's 1942 Hamlet, Huang notes that the production was "[s]cripted and not improvised, as many early-twentieth-century Chinese performance had been" (p. 135), thus giving the impression that it was a unique case of using full scripts when in fact huaju productions had followed scripts for two decades and the practice of improvisation was limited to the 1910s. While he perceptively notes that the term huaju (literally "speech drama") was deliberately chosen in opposition to xiqu (song or music theatre), he somewhat oversimplifies the case by stating, "[H]uaju activists were unaware that Western style theater did not always emphasize verbal elements over other elements, such http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Theatre of Roots: Redirecting the Modern Indian Stage (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 27 (1) – Aug 11, 2010

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

ple, while discussing Lin's 1904 translation of Tales from Shakespeare, he notes that "Lin was not assimilating Shakespeare in order to introduce new expressive modes in the emerging modern Chinese theatre" (p. 85). When discussing two reformed jingju plays in 1904 and 1906, he argues that "while the nascent Western-style spoken drama was limited to the elite urbanites, xiqu was a popular form of entertainment with a much larger audience and was often used for propagandist purposes" (p. 59). These two statements compare cultural practices to the huaju they predated. In his discussion of Jiao's 1942 Hamlet, Huang notes that the production was "[s]cripted and not improvised, as many early-twentieth-century Chinese performance had been" (p. 135), thus giving the impression that it was a unique case of using full scripts when in fact huaju productions had followed scripts for two decades and the practice of improvisation was limited to the 1910s. While he perceptively notes that the term huaju (literally "speech drama") was deliberately chosen in opposition to xiqu (song or music theatre), he somewhat oversimplifies the case by stating, "[H]uaju activists were unaware that Western style theater did not always emphasize verbal elements over other elements, such

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 11, 2010

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