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Theatre and Political Process: Staging Identities in Tokelau and New Zealand (review)

Theatre and Political Process: Staging Identities in Tokelau and New Zealand (review) book and media reviews the daughter's eczema (an often accusatory insistence on its high incidence among "half-Polynesian children" [58]), and the resources available to address it (the eczema "magazine of white children" never once features a "waka blonde" (a part-Mäori /part-Päkehä child with blonde hair [59]) render chronic-- and often unmarked--forms of racism visible, even as the book's commentary about land evokes a larger history of dispossession in which to situate its everyday manifestations. When the skyrocketing housing market forces the couple to move from Grey Lynn, the poet reflects, "This is perhaps a good / place to take time out to think how the tangata [people] / whenua [of the land] felt, this land theirs and they couldn't / live on it" (8). Despite Kennedy's use of the thirdperson to convey the perspective of the "eczema-mother," and despite her distinctive irony, the effect of the narrative that the poems construct is intimate and inviting. Throughout the book, the conversational secondperson address to the audience draws us close. Moreover, by representing the mother's perspective in the third person, Kennedy communicates in an understated way the need for and the impossibility of achieving distance when helplessly watching a beloved http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Theatre and Political Process: Staging Identities in Tokelau and New Zealand (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 27, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews the daughter's eczema (an often accusatory insistence on its high incidence among "half-Polynesian children" [58]), and the resources available to address it (the eczema "magazine of white children" never once features a "waka blonde" (a part-Mäori /part-Päkehä child with blonde hair [59]) render chronic-- and often unmarked--forms of racism visible, even as the book's commentary about land evokes a larger history of dispossession in which to situate its everyday manifestations. When the skyrocketing housing market forces the couple to move from Grey Lynn, the poet reflects, "This is perhaps a good / place to take time out to think how the tangata [people] / whenua [of the land] felt, this land theirs and they couldn't / live on it" (8). Despite Kennedy's use of the thirdperson to convey the perspective of the "eczema-mother," and despite her distinctive irony, the effect of the narrative that the poems construct is intimate and inviting. Throughout the book, the conversational secondperson address to the audience draws us close. Moreover, by representing the mother's perspective in the third person, Kennedy communicates in an understated way the need for and the impossibility of achieving distance when helplessly watching a beloved

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 27, 2006

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