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The Word Is the World: Nondualism in Indian Philosophy of Language

The Word Is the World: Nondualism in Indian Philosophy of Language Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia As someone writing on texts and thinkers in the Indian philosophical tradition, I should begin by criticizing the departments of philosophy at Western universities for the narrow and colored view they have of Eastern philosophies. However, since I am at present speaking at a department of philosophy (at the University of Hawai`i) that has probably done more for Eastern philosophies than any other department of philosophy in the Western world, I may not come across as credible if I voice the by-now-familiar but justified complaint of scholars interested in Eastern philosophies: I may be seen as an ungracious guest if not as someone whose statement is contradicted immediately by the evidence around him. If, after all the hospitality I have received from Professors Arindam Chakrabarti, Vrinda Dalmiya, Ramanath Sharma, and Eliot Deutsch and several students, I act as if I do not remember it, that karma will make me, in my next life, a politician! Although Hawai`i's enviable philosophy department has thus deprived me of a provocative opening, I retain the freedom to express apprehension about certain tendencies I detect in contemporary philosophers. Since I am primarily a Sanskritist and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Word Is the World: Nondualism in Indian Philosophy of Language

Philosophy East and West , Volume 51 (4) – Jan 10, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia As someone writing on texts and thinkers in the Indian philosophical tradition, I should begin by criticizing the departments of philosophy at Western universities for the narrow and colored view they have of Eastern philosophies. However, since I am at present speaking at a department of philosophy (at the University of Hawai`i) that has probably done more for Eastern philosophies than any other department of philosophy in the Western world, I may not come across as credible if I voice the by-now-familiar but justified complaint of scholars interested in Eastern philosophies: I may be seen as an ungracious guest if not as someone whose statement is contradicted immediately by the evidence around him. If, after all the hospitality I have received from Professors Arindam Chakrabarti, Vrinda Dalmiya, Ramanath Sharma, and Eliot Deutsch and several students, I act as if I do not remember it, that karma will make me, in my next life, a politician! Although Hawai`i's enviable philosophy department has thus deprived me of a provocative opening, I retain the freedom to express apprehension about certain tendencies I detect in contemporary philosophers. Since I am primarily a Sanskritist and

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 10, 2001

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